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Monascus purpureus-fermented Thai glutinous rice reduces blood and hepatic cholesterol and hepatic steatosis concentrations in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rats

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, March 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)

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2 patents

Citations

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13 Dimensions

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Title
Monascus purpureus-fermented Thai glutinous rice reduces blood and hepatic cholesterol and hepatic steatosis concentrations in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rats
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12906-015-0624-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anurak Bunnoy, Kanokporn Saenphet, Saisamorn Lumyong, Supap Saenphet, Siriwadee Chomdej

Abstract

Red yeast rice (RYR) is a fermented product used as a food supplement to promote blood circulation and lower blood cholesterol levels in eastern Asia. Interestingly, monacolin K is the most active compound in RYR that proved to inhibit HMG-CoA reductase in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. The hypocholesterolemic effects of oral administration of Thai RYR, produced by fermentation of Thai glutinous rice (Oryza sativa L. var. Niaw San-pah-tawng) with Monascus purpureus CMU 002U, were determined in normal and hypercholesterolemic rats. The rats were divided into six groups, and fed two different kinds of diet. Groups I-II, normal rats fed with a normal diet (SP-diet), were treated with distilled water (SP-control) and 2.0 g/kg/day of RYR extract (SP-2 g). In Groups III-VI, the rats were rendered hypercholesterolemic by feeding them a high fat and cholesterol diet (HFC-diet), and were treated with distilled water (HFC-control), 1.0 g/kg/day (HFC-1 g), 2.0 g/kg/day (HFC-2 g) of RYR extract, and 5.0 mg/kg/day of rosuvastatin (HFC-rosuvastatin) for 30 days, respectively. The RYR extract significantly decreased the concentrations of serum total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), atherosclerotic index, LDL-C/HDL-C ratio and hepatic cholesterol levels in both HFC-1 g and HFC-2 g groups (p < 0.05) as compared with the HFC-control group, and with no significant change in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations among all six groups. The reduction of serum TC and LDL-C also paralleled the observed changes in mRNA expressions of the genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis and homeostasis in the liver. The hypercholesterolemic rats treated with RYR extract were significantly higher in LDLR and HMGR expression, but lower in CYP7A1 expression when compared to the untreated hypercholesterolemic rats (HFC-control) (p < 0.05). The hepatic injuries in hypercholesterolemic rats were also obviously alleviated by RYR extract. The extract of Thai RYR possessed potent hypocholesterolemic and anti-atherogenic activities in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rats. The possible mechanism involving cholesterol-lowering potential of the extract might contribute to its ability to increase LDL-C endocytosis in hepatocyte and to competitively inhibit HMG-CoA reductase, a key enzyme for cholesterol biosynthesis in liver.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
Unknown 50 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 24%
Student > Master 8 16%
Researcher 5 10%
Other 3 6%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 13 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 10%
Chemistry 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 18 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2018.
All research outputs
#3,489,766
of 17,635,820 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#678
of 2,979 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,116
of 240,909 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,635,820 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,979 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,909 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them