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The Rat Grimace Scale: A Partially Automated Method for Quantifying Pain in the Laboratory Rat via Facial Expressions

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Pain, January 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 581)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
21 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
14 tweeters
patent
8 patents
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
linkedin
1 LinkedIn user

Citations

dimensions_citation
424 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
642 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
The Rat Grimace Scale: A Partially Automated Method for Quantifying Pain in the Laboratory Rat via Facial Expressions
Published in
Molecular Pain, January 2011
DOI 10.1186/1744-8069-7-55
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susana G Sotocina, Robert E Sorge, Austin Zaloum, Alexander H Tuttle, Loren J Martin, Jeffrey S Wieskopf, Josiane CS Mapplebeck, Peng Wei, Shu Zhan, Shuren Zhang, Jason J McDougall, Oliver D King, Jeffrey S Mogil

Abstract

We recently demonstrated the utility of quantifying spontaneous pain in mice via the blinded coding of facial expressions. As the majority of preclinical pain research is in fact performed in the laboratory rat, we attempted to modify the scale for use in this species. We present herein the Rat Grimace Scale, and show its reliability, accuracy, and ability to quantify the time course of spontaneous pain in the intraplantar complete Freund's adjuvant, intraarticular kaolin-carrageenan, and laparotomy (post-operative pain) assays. The scale's ability to demonstrate the dose-dependent analgesic efficacy of morphine is also shown. In addition, we have developed software, Rodent Face Finder®, which successfully automates the most labor-intensive step in the process. Given the known mechanistic dissociations between spontaneous and evoked pain, and the primacy of the former as a clinical problem, we believe that widespread adoption of spontaneous pain measures such as the Rat Grimace Scale might lead to more successful translation of basic science findings into clinical application.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 642 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 <1%
United Kingdom 5 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Other 4 <1%
Unknown 620 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 128 20%
Student > Master 101 16%
Researcher 81 13%
Student > Bachelor 73 11%
Student > Postgraduate 36 6%
Other 113 18%
Unknown 110 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 154 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 95 15%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 78 12%
Neuroscience 65 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 25 4%
Other 90 14%
Unknown 135 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 213. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2021.
All research outputs
#112,226
of 19,394,767 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Pain
#1
of 581 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#421
of 115,971 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Pain
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,394,767 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 581 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 115,971 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them