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The growing caseload of chronic life-long conditions calls for a move towards full self-management in low-income countries

Overview of attention for article published in Globalization and Health, January 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
46 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
110 Mendeley
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Title
The growing caseload of chronic life-long conditions calls for a move towards full self-management in low-income countries
Published in
Globalization and Health, January 2011
DOI 10.1186/1744-8603-7-38
Pubmed ID
Authors

Josefien van Olmen, Grace Ku, Raoul Bermejo, Guy Kegels, Katharina Hermann, Wim Van Damme

Abstract

The growing caseload caused by patients with chronic life-long conditions leads to increased needs for health care providers and rising costs of health services, resulting in a heavy burden on health systems, populations and individuals. The professionalised health care for chronic patients common in high income countries is very labour-intensive and expensive. Moreover, the outcomes are often poor. In low-income countries, the scarce resources and the lack of quality and continuity of health care result in high health care expenditure and very poor health outcomes. The current proposals to improve care for chronic patients in low-income countries are still very much provider-centred.The aim of this paper is to show that present provider-centred models of chronic care are not adequate and to propose 'full self-management' as an alternative for low-income countries, facilitated by expert patient networks and smart phone technology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Sierra Leone 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 105 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 25%
Researcher 20 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 17%
Student > Postgraduate 6 5%
Student > Bachelor 5 5%
Other 20 18%
Unknown 12 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 43 39%
Social Sciences 16 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 7%
Computer Science 5 5%
Psychology 4 4%
Other 13 12%
Unknown 21 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2015.
All research outputs
#1,615,290
of 17,351,915 outputs
Outputs from Globalization and Health
#272
of 887 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,413
of 110,530 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Globalization and Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,351,915 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 887 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 110,530 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them