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The use of assistive technology in shoulder exercise rehabilitation – a qualitative study of acceptability within a pilot project

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
27 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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83 Mendeley
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Title
The use of assistive technology in shoulder exercise rehabilitation – a qualitative study of acceptability within a pilot project
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12891-018-2042-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anthony W. Gilbert, Iva Hauptmannova, Anju Jaggi

Abstract

Painful shoulders pose a substantial socioeconomic burden accounting for 2.4% of all primary care consultations in the UK. There is a strong evidence to indicate that the majority of this shoulder pain can be managed successfully with exercise based treatments and that common surgical procedures provide no extra benefit. Patient adherence and engagement is cited as an important factor in gaining positive outcomes. The MUJO System has been designed to help target the rehabilitation of the rotator cuff muscles which are commonly recommended for the management of shoulder pain. The purpose of this qualitative study was to evaluate the acceptability of the MUJO System amongst clinicians and patients. A qualitative study was undertaken to look at the usability of the MUJO System both from clinicians' and patients' perspectives. Patients with shoulder problems were identified by an experienced physiotherapist using the study eligibility criteria. and invited to participate. Semi-structured interviews were performed with patients and clinicians to explore factors surrounding its acceptability and feasibility of use. The study was designed using Normalisation Process Theory as a theoretical basis for the inquiry. Seven physiotherapists and ten patients were interviewed in the study. The Internal and External Devices were seen as having the potential to rehabilitate the rotator cuff however it posed limitations towards more functional based exercises. Patients and clinicians found the visual feedback from the Patient App enhanced the rehabilitation experience. The Internal and External Devices were acceptable to all for rehabilitation providing the devices were available for use by the patients in the community. Patients and clinicians found the MUJO System acceptable as a modality to perform shoulder exercises. For the MUJO System to be taken up as a routine part of clinical practice patients need to be able to access the devices in the community. For the MUJO System to be taken up in clinical practice it needs to be workable within the context of the treatment pathway and not interfere with standard processes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 83 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 22%
Student > Bachelor 12 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Researcher 5 6%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 27 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 21 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 13%
Psychology 4 5%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Arts and Humanities 2 2%
Other 9 11%
Unknown 33 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 June 2018.
All research outputs
#1,119,752
of 21,423,731 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#201
of 3,790 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,768
of 296,622 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,423,731 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,790 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 296,622 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them