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Effect of genetic ancestry on leukocyte global DNA methylation in cancer patients

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

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25 tweeters

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

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48 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of genetic ancestry on leukocyte global DNA methylation in cancer patients
Published in
BMC Cancer, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1461-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mónica Cappetta, María Berdasco, Jimena Hochmann, Carolina Bonilla, Mónica Sans, Pedro C Hidalgo, Nora Artagaveytia, Rick Kittles, Miguel Martínez, Manel Esteller, Bernardo Bertoni

Abstract

The study of genetic variants alone is not enough to explain a complex disease like cancer. Alterations in DNA methylation patterns have been associated with different types of tumor. In order to detect markers of susceptibility for the development of cutaneous melanoma and breast cancer in the Uruguayan population, we integrated genetic and epigenetic information of patients and controls. We performed two case-control studies that included 49 individuals with sporadic cutaneous melanoma and 73 unaffected controls, and 179 women with sporadic breast cancer and 209 women controls. We determined the level of global leukocyte DNA methylation using relative quantification of 5mdC by HPLC, and we compared methylation levels between cases and controls with nonparametric statistical tests. Since the Uruguayan population is admixed and both melanoma and breast cancer have very high incidences in Uruguay compared to other populations, we examined whether individual ancestry influences global leucocyte DNA methylation status. We carried out a correlation analysis between the percentage of African, European and Native American individual ancestries, determined using 59 ancestry informative markers, and global DNA methylation in all participants. We detected global DNA hypomethylation in leukocytes of melanoma and breast cancer patients compared with healthy controls (p < 0.001). Additionally, we found a negative correlation between African ancestry and global DNA methylation in cancer patients (p <0.005). These results support the potential use of global DNA methylation as a biomarker for cancer risk. In addition, our findings suggest that the ancestral genome structure generated by the admixture process influences DNA methylation patterns, and underscore the importance of considering genetic ancestry as a modifying factor in epigenetic association studies in admixed populations such as Latino ones.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Uruguay 3 6%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 44 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 10%
Student > Master 5 10%
Other 12 25%
Unknown 5 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 10 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2021.
All research outputs
#1,545,577
of 21,798,458 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#226
of 7,919 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,661
of 250,473 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,798,458 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,919 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,473 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them