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Clinical utility of blood neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio in Japanese COPD patients

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pulmonary Medicine, May 2018
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Title
Clinical utility of blood neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio in Japanese COPD patients
Published in
BMC Pulmonary Medicine, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12890-018-0639-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kaori Sakurai, Shotaro Chubachi, Hidehiro Irie, Akihiro Tsutsumi, Naofumi Kameyama, Takashi Kamatani, Hidefumi Koh, Takeshi Terashima, Hidetoshi Nakamura, Koichiro Asano, Tomoko Betsuyaku

Abstract

Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a biomarker of inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. But, a meaningful threshold and the longitudinal changes are unknown. We aimed to investigate the association between NLR and the clinical characteristics of COPD patients and to determine a meaningful threshold and the longitudinal changes for NLR. Keio University and its affiliate hospitals conducted an observational COPD cohort study over 3 years. We performed a blood examination and a pulmonary function test. Blood examination was completed at baseline and annually thereafter, at a time when the disease was stable. Two hundred seventy-four patients who had at least 3 blood examinations over 3 years were included. Baseline NLR was correlated with baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) (r = 0.18, p = 0.003) and SAA (r = 0.34, p <  0.001). We defined an NLR score of 2.7 as the arbitrary cut-off value based on upper quartile points. COPD patients with NLR ≥ 2.7 were older (p = 0.037), had a lower BMI (p = 0.005) and a lower %FEV1 (p = 0.0003) compared to patients with NLR < 2.7. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves showed the optimal cutoff for the baseline NLR in the predicting moderate/severe exacerbation to be 2.7, which was same as the upper quartile points. Follow-up analysis over 3 years revealed that the differences in the trends of NLR among the three groups based on the categories of exacerbations (moderate or severe, mild, no exacerbation) were significant (p = 0.006). NLR is associated with COPD severity and exacerbations. For predicting exacerbations, we estimated the threshold of NLR to be 2.7 at baseline. Clinical trial registered with the University Hospital Medication Information Network ( UMIN000003470 , April 10, 2010).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 15%
Other 4 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Researcher 2 6%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 10 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 55%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Decision Sciences 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 11 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2018.
All research outputs
#8,081,411
of 12,886,920 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pulmonary Medicine
#576
of 1,017 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,032
of 269,061 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pulmonary Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,886,920 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,017 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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