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Implementation of the SMART MOVE intervention in primary care: a qualitative study using normalisation process theory

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, May 2018
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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193 Mendeley
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Title
Implementation of the SMART MOVE intervention in primary care: a qualitative study using normalisation process theory
Published in
BMC Family Practice, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12875-018-0737-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Liam G. Glynn, Fergus Glynn, Monica Casey, Louise Gaffney Wilkinson, Patrick S. Hayes, David Heaney, Andrew W. M. Murphy

Abstract

Problematic translational gaps continue to exist between demonstrating the positive impact of healthcare interventions in research settings and their implementation into routine daily practice. The aim of this qualitative evaluation of the SMART MOVE trial was to conduct a theoretically informed analysis, using normalisation process theory, of the potential barriers and levers to the implementation of a mhealth intervention to promote physical activity in primary care. The study took place in the West of Ireland with recruitment in the community from the Clare Primary Care Network. SMART MOVE trial participants and the staff from four primary care centres were invited to take part and all agreed to do so. A qualitative methodology with a combination of focus groups (general practitioners, practice nurses and non-clinical staff from four separate primary care centres, n = 14) and individual semi-structured interviews (intervention and control SMART MOVE trial participants, n = 4) with purposeful sampling utilising the principles of Framework Analysis was utilised. The Normalisation Process Theory was used to develop the topic guide for the interviews and also informed the data analysis process. Four themes emerged from the analysis: personal and professional exercise strategies; roles and responsibilities to support active engagement; utilisation challenges; and evaluation, adoption and adherence. It was evident that introducing a new healthcare intervention demands a comprehensive evaluation of the intervention itself and also the environment in which it is to operate. Despite certain obstacles, the opportunity exists for the successful implementation of a novel healthcare intervention that addresses a hitherto unresolved healthcare need, provided that the intervention has strong usability attributes for both disseminators and target users and coheres strongly with the core objectives and culture of the health care environment in which it is to operate. We carried out a theoretical analysis of stakeholder informed barriers and levers to the implementation of a novel exercise promotion tool in the Irish primary care setting. We believe that this process amplifies the implementation potential of such an intervention in primary care. The SMART MOVE trial is registered at Current Controlled Trials (ISRCTN99944116; Date of registration: 1st August 2012).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 193 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 193 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 25 13%
Student > Master 23 12%
Researcher 20 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 7%
Other 38 20%
Unknown 59 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 44 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 29 15%
Unspecified 12 6%
Sports and Recreations 11 6%
Social Sciences 6 3%
Other 28 15%
Unknown 63 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 May 2018.
All research outputs
#3,281,690
of 12,953,232 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#445
of 1,286 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87,720
of 268,907 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,953,232 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,286 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,907 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them