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Telomere length differences between colorectal polyp subtypes: a colonoscopy-based case-control study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, May 2018
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Title
Telomere length differences between colorectal polyp subtypes: a colonoscopy-based case-control study
Published in
BMC Cancer, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12885-018-4426-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sheetal Hardikar, Andrea N. Burnett-Hartman, Amanda I. Phipps, Melissa P. Upton, Lee-Ching Zhu, Polly A. Newcomb

Abstract

Short telomeres have been associated with increased risk of many cancers, particularly cancers of the gastrointestinal tract including esophagus and stomach. However, the association between telomere length (TL) and colorectal cancer and its precursors, colorectal polyps, is not clear. We investigated the relationship between TL and risk of colorectal polyp subtypes in a colonoscopy-based study in western Washington. Participants were 35-79 year-old enrollees at an integrated health care system, who underwent a colonoscopy between 1998 and 2007 (n = 190), completed a self-administered questionnaire, provided blood samples, and were distinguished as having adenomas, serrated polyps, or as polyp-free controls through a standardized pathology review. Telomere length (T) relative to a single copy gene (S) was measured in circulating leukocytes from stored buffy coat samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Multivariable polytomous logistic regression was used to compare case groups with polyp-free controls and other case groups; adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. TL in the shortest tertile (T/S ratio < 0.58) was associated with increased risk of adenomas and serrated polyps [OR (95%CI) were 1.77(0.81-3.88) and 2.98(1.15-7.77), respectively). When evaluated by lesion severity within each pathway, short TL was more strongly associated with advanced adenomas and sessile serrated polyps [OR (95% CI) = 1.90(0.76-4.73) and 3.82(0.86-16.86), respectively], although the associations were not statistically significant. Our results suggest that short TL may be associated with an increased risk of colorectal polyps in both the adenoma-carcinoma and serrated pathways. The risk was particularly notable for sessile serrated polyps, although the association was not statistically significant and sample size was limited.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 17%
Researcher 2 17%
Student > Master 2 17%
Librarian 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 17%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2018.
All research outputs
#14,623,847
of 16,578,610 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#4,830
of 6,083 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#243,242
of 281,653 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#1
of 1 outputs
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