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Gender and power: Nurses and doctors in Canada

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal for Equity in Health, February 2003
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
79 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
220 Mendeley
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Title
Gender and power: Nurses and doctors in Canada
Published in
International Journal for Equity in Health, February 2003
DOI 10.1186/1475-9276-2-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Barbara Zelek, Susan P Phillips

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The nurse-doctor relationship is historically one of female nurse deference to male physician authority. We investigated the effects of physicians' sex on female nurses' behaviour. METHODS: Nurses at an urban, university based hospital completed one of two forms of a vignette-based survey in January, 2000. Each survey included four clinical scenarios. In form 1 of the questionnaire the physicians described were female, male, female, and male. In form 2, vignettes were identical but the physician sex was changed to male, female, male, and female. Differences in responses to questions based on the sex of the physician in each vignette were studied RESULTS: 199 self-selected nurses completed the survey. The responses of 177 female respondents and 11 respondents who did not specifiy their sex, and were assumed to be female based on the overall sex ratio of respondents, were analysed. Persistent sex-role stereotypes influenced the relationship between female nurses and physicians. Nurses were more willing to serve and defer to male physicians. They approached female physicians on a more egalitarian basis, were more comfortable communicating with them, yet more hostile toward them. CONCLUSION: When nurses and doctors are female, traditional power imbalances in their relationship diminish, suggesting that these imbalances are based as much on gender as on professional hierarchy. The effects of this change on the authority of the medical profession, the role of nurses, and on patient care merit further exploration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 220 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Nigeria 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Uganda 1 <1%
Unknown 213 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 10%
Student > Master 19 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 5%
Professor > Associate Professor 9 4%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 4%
Other 26 12%
Unknown 127 58%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 15%
Social Sciences 16 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 9 4%
Arts and Humanities 4 2%
Other 15 7%
Unknown 129 59%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 November 2019.
All research outputs
#1,051,749
of 17,359,532 outputs
Outputs from International Journal for Equity in Health
#147
of 1,531 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,055
of 120,198 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal for Equity in Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,359,532 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,531 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 120,198 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them