↓ Skip to main content

Bridging the gap between gastric pouch and jejunum: a bariatric nightmare

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Surgery, May 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Bridging the gap between gastric pouch and jejunum: a bariatric nightmare
Published in
BMC Surgery, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12893-015-0043-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Noëlle Geubbels, Ingrid Kappers, Arnold W. J. M. van de Laar

Abstract

Even in a large volume bariatric centre, bariatric surgeons are sometimes confronted with intraoperative anatomical challenges which force even the most experienced surgeon into a pioneering position. In this video we present how a large gap of approximately 8 cm is bridged by applying several techniques that are not part of our standardized surgical procedure. After creation of a 20 mL gastric pouch we discovered that the alimentary limb could not be advanced further cranially due to a very short a thick jejunal mesentery in a 49 year old male patient during laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) surgery. By dissecting the gastro-oesophageal junction form the crus, stretching the gastric pouch, transecting the jejunal mesentery, using a retrocolic/retrogastric route, and creating a fully hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy we were able to safely complete the LRYGB. Drains were left near the gastrojejunostomy and the patient was kept nil by mouth for 5 days. On the 5th postoperative day radiographic swallow series were obtained which revealed no sign of leakage. The patient was discharged in good clinical condition on the 6th postoperative day. To date, no complications have occurred. Weight loss results are -31.5 % of the preoperative total body weight. When confronted with a large distance between the gastric pouch and the alimentary limb, several techniques presented in this video may be of aid to the bariatric surgeon. We stress that only experienced bariatric surgeon should embark on these techniques. Inspecting the alimentary limb before the creation of the gastric pouch may prevent the need for such complex techniques.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 27%
Student > Bachelor 2 18%
Student > Master 2 18%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 55%
Environmental Science 1 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 9%
Engineering 1 9%
Unknown 2 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 September 2015.
All research outputs
#6,233,884
of 8,596,331 outputs
Outputs from BMC Surgery
#171
of 340 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,436
of 221,169 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Surgery
#14
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,596,331 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 340 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 221,169 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.