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Combined effect of genetic background and gender in a mouse model of bleomycin-induced skin fibrosis

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, May 2015
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Title
Combined effect of genetic background and gender in a mouse model of bleomycin-induced skin fibrosis
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13075-015-0659-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nadira Ruzehaji, Jerome Avouac, Muriel Elhai, Maxime Frechet, Camelia Frantz, Barbara Ruiz, Joerg H. Distler, Yannick Allanore

Abstract

Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disorder characterised by the development of skin fibrosis. Our current understanding of the disease pathogenesis is incomplete and the study of SSc is hindered, at least partially, by a lack of animal models that fully replicate the complex state of human disease. Murine model of bleomycin-induced dermal fibrosis encapsulates important events that take place early in the disease course. To characterise the optimum in vivo parameters required for the successful induction of dermal fibrosis we subjected three commonly used mouse strains to repeated subcutaneous bleomycin injections. We aimed to identify the effects of genetic background and gender on the severity of skin fibrosis. We used male and female Balb/C, C57BL/6, and DBA/2 strains and assessed their susceptibility to bleomycin-induced fibrosis by measuring dermal thickness, hydroxyproline/collagen content and number of resident myofibroblasts, all of which are important indicators of the severity of skin fibrosis. All data are expressed as mean values ± SEM. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for statistical analysis with GraphPad Prism 6.04 software. Dermal fibrosis was most severe in Balb/C mice compared to C57BL/6 and DBA/2 suggesting that Balb/C mice are more susceptible to bleomycin-induced fibrosis. Analysis of the effect of gender on the severity of fibrosis showed that male Balb/C, C57BL/6, DBA/2 mice had a tendency to develop more pronounced fibrosis phenotype than female mice. Of potential importance, male Balb/C mice developed the most severe fibrosis phenotype compared to male C57BL/6 and male DBA/2 as indicated by significantly increased number of dermal myofibroblasts. Our study highlights the importance of genetic background and gender in the induction of murine dermal fibrosis. Robust and reproducible animal models of fibrosis are important research tools used in pharmacological studies which may lead to better understanding of the pathogenesis of fibrotic diseases and assist in identification of new drugs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 22%
Researcher 11 19%
Student > Master 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 11 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 17 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2015.
All research outputs
#11,070,250
of 12,451,992 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1,888
of 1,983 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#190,887
of 231,111 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#27
of 28 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,983 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.