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Comparative transcriptomic analysis revealed adaptation mechanism of Phrynocephalus erythrurus, the highest altitude Lizard living in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
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Title
Comparative transcriptomic analysis revealed adaptation mechanism of Phrynocephalus erythrurus, the highest altitude Lizard living in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0371-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yongzhi Yang, Lizhong Wang, Jin Han, Xiaolong Tang, Ming Ma, Kun Wang, Xiao Zhang, Qian Ren, Qiang Chen, Qiang Qiu

Abstract

Organisms living at high altitudes must overcome three major environmental challenges: hypoxia, cold, and intense UV radiation. The molecular mechanisms that enable these challenges to be overcome have mainly been studied in endothermic organisms; relatively little attention has been paid to poikilothermic species. Here, we present deep transcriptome sequencing in two closely related lizards, the high altitude-dwelling Phrynocephalus erythrurus and the lowland-dwelling P. putjatia, to identify candidate genes under positive selection and to explore the convergent evolutionary adaptation of poikilothermic animals to high altitude life. More than 70 million sequence reads were generated for each species via Illumina sequencing. De novo assembly produced 56,845 and 63,140 transcripts for P. erythrurus and P. putjatia, respectively. P. erythrurus had higher Ka/Ks ratios than P. putjatia, implying an accelerated evolutionary rate in the high altitude lizard lineage. 206 gene ontology (GO) categories with accelerated evolutionary rates and 43 candidate positively selected genes were detected along the P. erythrurus lineage. Some of these GO categories have functions associated with responses to hypoxia, energy metabolism and responses to UV damage. We also found that the high-altitude ranid frog R. kukunoris had higher Ka/Ks ratios than the closely related low-altitude frog R. chensinensis, and that the functional categories with accelerated evolutionary rates in R. kukunoris overlapped extensively with those detected along the P. erythrurus lineage. The mechanisms of high altitude adaptation in P. erythrurus were tentatively inferred. By comparing two pairs of low- and high-altitude poikilothermic species, we found that similar functional categories had undergone positive selection in high altitude-dwelling Phrynocephalus and Rana lineages, indicating that similar mechanisms of adaptation to high altitude might have evolved in both genera. Our findings provide important guidance for future functional studies on high altitude adaptation in poikilothermic animals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Unknown 76 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 24%
Student > Master 14 18%
Researcher 9 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 9 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 41 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 22%
Environmental Science 5 6%
Arts and Humanities 1 1%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 1%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 10 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 December 2015.
All research outputs
#782,280
of 8,974,549 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#330
of 2,097 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,045
of 224,542 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#15
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,974,549 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,097 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,542 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.