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Determinants of early neonatal mortality in Afghanistan: an analysis of the Demographic and Health Survey 2015

Overview of attention for article published in Globalization and Health, May 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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160 Mendeley
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Title
Determinants of early neonatal mortality in Afghanistan: an analysis of the Demographic and Health Survey 2015
Published in
Globalization and Health, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12992-018-0363-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gulam Muhammed Al Kibria, Vanessa Burrowes, Allysha Choudhury, Atia Sharmeen, Swagata Ghosh, Arif Mahmud, Angela KC

Abstract

Neonatal mortality is declining slowly compared to under-five mortality in many developing countries including Afghanistan. About three-fourths of these deaths occur in the early neonatal period (i.e., the first week of life). Although a number of studies investigated determinants of early neonatal mortality in other countries, there is a lack of evidence regarding this in Afghanistan. This study investigated determinants of early neonatal mortality in Afghanistan. Data from the Afghanistan Demographic and Health Survey 2015 (AfDHS 2015) were analyzed. After reporting the weighted frequency distributions of selected factors, a multilevel logistic regression model revealed adjusted associations of factors with early neonatal mortality. A total of 19,801 weighted live-births were included in our analysis; 266 (1.4%) of the newborns died in this period. Multivariable analysis found that multiple gestations (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 9.3; 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.7-15.0), larger (AOR: 2.9; 95% CI: 2.2-3.8) and smaller (AOR: 1.8; 95% CI: 1.2-2.6) than average birth size, maternal age ≤ 18 years (AOR: 1.8; 95% CI: 1.1-3.2) and ≥ 35 years (AOR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.3-2.3), and birth interval of < 2 years (AOR: 2.6; 95% CI: 1.4-4.9) had higher odds of early neonatal mortality. On the other hand, antenatal care by a skilled provider (AOR: 0.7; 95% CI: 0.5-0.9), facility delivery (AOR: 0.7; 955 CI: 0.5-0.9), paternal higher education level (AOR: 0.7; 95% CI: 0.5-1.0), living in north-western (AOR: 0.3; 95% CI: 0.1-0.6), central-western regions (AOR: 0.5; 95% CI: 0.3-0.9) and in a community with higher maternal education level (AOR: 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2-0.9) had negative association. Several individual, maternal and community level factors influence early neonatal deaths in Afghanistan; significance of the elements of multiple levels indicates that neonatal survival programs should follow a multifaceted approach to incorporate these associated factors. Programs should focus on birth interval prolongation with the promotion of family planning services, utilization of antenatal care and institutional delivery services along with management of preterm and sick infants to prevent this large number of deaths in this period.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 160 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 160 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 36 23%
Student > Bachelor 21 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 9%
Researcher 14 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 5%
Other 22 14%
Unknown 44 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 38 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 37 23%
Social Sciences 16 10%
Arts and Humanities 4 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 3%
Other 8 5%
Unknown 53 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 May 2018.
All research outputs
#2,280,270
of 17,053,340 outputs
Outputs from Globalization and Health
#381
of 874 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,245
of 284,856 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Globalization and Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,053,340 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 874 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,856 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them