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Predictors of marked weight gain in a population of health care and industrial workers following smoking cessation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, May 2015
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Title
Predictors of marked weight gain in a population of health care and industrial workers following smoking cessation
Published in
BMC Public Health, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1854-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andreas Scherr, Bruno Seifert, Martin Kuster, Anja Meyer, Karl-Olov Fagerstroem, Michael Tamm, Daiana Stolz

Abstract

Concerns about postcessational weight gain might hamper rather than encourage smokers to quit smoking. We conducted a comprehensive multi-institutional smoking cessation program for health care and industrial workers (n = 654) employed at University Hospital Basel (Switzerland) and two local health industry companies (Novartis International AG, F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG). The program contained counselling with an option of pharmacological support. Changes in body weight were observed during 24 months of follow-up. Factors associated with longitudinal weight gain (>5 % of baseline weight) were identified by cox-regression analysis. In 51 % of permanent quitters no significant changes of mean body weight were observed after 12 (0.52 kg, SD ±2.87 kg) and 24 months (0.40 kg, SD ± 2.99 kg). Marked weight gain following smoking cessation was characterized by a wide margin of changes. In more than a half of former smokers (58 %) weight increases were moderate (<5 kg), whereas excessive increases (>10 kg) were seen in only 10 % of quitters. Lower baseline BMI (HR 0.60, 95 % CI 0.40- 0.80, p = 0.03), daily consumption of less than ten cigarettes (HR 0.53, 95 % CI 0.27- 0.63, p = 0.04) and ischemic cardiopathy (HR 0.21, 95 % CI 0.07-0.62; p < 0.01) were associated with a lower risk for weight gain. Employees with lower educational levels (HR 2.60, 95 % CI 1.60-5.50, p < 0.01), diabetes mellitus (HR 3.05, 95 % CI 2.20-8.06, p = 0.02) and those smoking to reduce boredom in life (HR 1.68, 95 % CI 1.21-2.33, p < 0.01) were at highest risk. Marked postcessational weight gain occurs less often than expected, but remains difficult to be predicted. Our findings might be helpful to alleviate weight concerns in the average smoker willing to quit.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 43 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 20%
Student > Master 6 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Researcher 3 7%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 15 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 7 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Psychology 5 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 16 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 June 2015.
All research outputs
#3,647,978
of 5,187,004 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,779
of 5,604 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,159
of 175,002 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#193
of 220 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,187,004 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,604 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 175,002 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 220 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.