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Abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome: exercise as medicine?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#29 of 438)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
41 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
74 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
363 Mendeley
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Title
Abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome: exercise as medicine?
Published in
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13102-018-0097-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carole A. Paley, Mark I. Johnson

Abstract

Metabolic syndrome is defined as a cluster of at least three out of five clinical risk factors: abdominal (visceral) obesity, hypertension, elevated serum triglycerides, low serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and insulin resistance. It is estimated to affect over 20% of the global adult population. Abdominal (visceral) obesity is thought to be the predominant risk factor for metabolic syndrome and as predictions estimate that 50% of adults will be classified as obese by 2030 it is likely that metabolic syndrome will be a significant problem for health services and a drain on health economies.Evidence shows that regular and consistent exercise reduces abdominal obesity and results in favourable changes in body composition. It has therefore been suggested that exercise is a medicine in its own right and should be prescribed as such. This review provides a summary of the current evidence on the pathophysiology of dysfunctional adipose tissue (adiposopathy). It describes the relationship of adiposopathy to metabolic syndrome and how exercise may mediate these processes, and evaluates current evidence on the clinical efficacy of exercise in the management of abdominal obesity. The review also discusses the type and dose of exercise needed for optimal improvements in health status in relation to the available evidence and considers the difficulty in achieving adherence to exercise programmes. There is moderate evidence supporting the use of programmes of exercise to reverse metabolic syndrome although at present the optimal dose and type of exercise is unknown. The main challenge for health care professionals is how to motivate individuals to participate and adherence to programmes of exercise used prophylactically and as a treatment for metabolic syndrome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 41 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 363 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 363 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 65 18%
Student > Master 59 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 7%
Researcher 23 6%
Other 18 5%
Other 70 19%
Unknown 103 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 67 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 43 12%
Sports and Recreations 31 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 28 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 4%
Other 60 17%
Unknown 121 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 45. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 July 2022.
All research outputs
#721,024
of 21,609,784 outputs
Outputs from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#29
of 438 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,824
of 297,513 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,609,784 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 438 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 297,513 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them