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Genetic diversity and characterization of arsenic-resistant endophytic bacteria isolated from Pteris vittata, an arsenic hyperaccumulator

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, May 2018
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Title
Genetic diversity and characterization of arsenic-resistant endophytic bacteria isolated from Pteris vittata, an arsenic hyperaccumulator
Published in
BMC Microbiology, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12866-018-1184-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yunfu Gu, Yingyan Wang, Yihao Sun, Ke Zhao, Quanju Xiang, Xiumei Yu, Xiaoping Zhang, Qiang Chen

Abstract

Alleviating arsenic (As) contamination is a high-priority environmental issue. Hyperaccumulator plants may harbor endophytic bacteria able to detoxify As. Therefore, we investigated the distribution, diversity, As (III) resistance levels, and resistance-related functional genes of arsenite-resistant bacterial endophytes in Pteris vittata L. growing in a lead-zinc mining area with different As contamination levels. A total of 116 arsenite-resistant bacteria were isolated from roots of P. vittata with different As concentrations. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of representative isolates, the isolates belonged to Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Major genera found were Agrobacterium, Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, and Bacillus. The most highly arsenite-resistant bacteria (minimum inhibitory concentration > 45 mM) were isolated from P. vittata with high As concentrations and belonged to the genera Agrobacterium and Bacillus. The strains with high As tolerance also showed high levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production and carried arsB/ACR3(2) genes. The arsB and ACR3(2) were most likely horizontally transferred among the strains. The results of this study suggest that P. vittata plants with high As concentrations may select diverse arsenite-resistant bacteria; this diversity might, at least partly, be a result of horizontal gene transfer. These diverse endophytic bacteria are potential candidates to enhance phytoremediation techniques.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 27%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 14%
Other 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 6 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 24%
Environmental Science 4 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 5%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 8 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2018.
All research outputs
#9,890,206
of 12,920,212 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#1,182
of 1,898 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#186,553
of 269,705 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#1
of 1 outputs
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