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Transvenous vagus nerve stimulation does not modulate the innate immune response during experimental human endotoxemia: a randomized controlled study

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, June 2015
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2 tweeters

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63 Mendeley
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Title
Transvenous vagus nerve stimulation does not modulate the innate immune response during experimental human endotoxemia: a randomized controlled study
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13075-015-0667-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthijs Kox, Lucas T. van Eijk, Tim Verhaak, Tim Frenzel, Harmke D. Kiers, Jelle Gerretsen, Johannes G. van der Hoeven, Lilian Kornet, Avram Scheiner, Peter Pickkers

Abstract

Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) exerts beneficial anti-inflammatory effects in various animal models of inflammation, including collagen-induced arthritis, and is implicated to represent a novel therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. However, evidence of anti-inflammatory effects of VNS in humans is very scarce. Transvenous VNS (tVNS) is a newly developed and less invasive method to stimulate the vagus nerve. In the present study, we determined whether tVNS is a feasible and safe procedure and investigated its putative anti-inflammatory effects during experimental human endotoxemia. We performed a randomized double-blind sham-controlled study in healthy male volunteers. A stimulation catheter was inserted in the left internal jugular vein at spinal level C5-C7, adjacent to the vagus nerve. In the tVNS group (n=10), stimulation was continuously performed for 30 minutes (0-10 V, 1 ms, 20 Hz), starting 10 minutes before intravenous administration of 2 ng kg(-1) E. Coli LPS. Sham-instrumented subjects (n=10) received no electrical stimulation. No serious adverse events occurred throughout the study. In the tVNS group, stimulation of the vagus nerve was achieved as indicated by laryngeal vibration. Endotoxemia resulted in fever, flu-like symptoms, and hemodynamic changes that were unaffected by tVNS. Furthermore, plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines increased sharply during endotoxemia, but responses were similar between groups. Finally, cytokine production by leukocytes stimulated with LPS ex vivo, as well as neutrophil phagocytosis capacity were not influenced by tVNS. tVNS is feasible and safe, but does not modulate the innate immune response in humans in vivo during experimental human endotoxemia. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01944228 . Registered 12 September 2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 62 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 22%
Researcher 12 19%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Master 4 6%
Other 4 6%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 13 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 33%
Engineering 7 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 8%
Neuroscience 5 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 12 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2017.
All research outputs
#9,566,798
of 12,451,992 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1,651
of 1,983 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#146,749
of 231,352 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#22
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,451,992 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,983 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,352 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.