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Does exam-targeted training help village doctors pass the certified (assistant) physician exam and improve their practical skills? A cross-sectional analysis of village doctors’ perspectives in…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, May 2018
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Title
Does exam-targeted training help village doctors pass the certified (assistant) physician exam and improve their practical skills? A cross-sectional analysis of village doctors’ perspectives in Changzhou in Eastern China
Published in
BMC Medical Education, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12909-018-1211-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xiaohong Li, Jay J. Shen, Fang Yao, Chunxin Jiang, Fengshui Chang, Fengfeng Hao, Jun Lu

Abstract

Quality of health care needs to be improved in rural China. The Chinese government, based on the 1999 Law on Physicians, started implementing the Rural Doctor Practice Regulation in 2004 to increase the percentage of certified physicians among village doctors. Special exam-targeted training for rural doctors therefore was launched as a national initiative. This study examined these rural doctors' perceptions of whether that training helps them pass the exam and whether it improves their skills. Three counties were selected from the 4 counties in Changzhou City in eastern China, and 844 village doctors were surveyed by a questionnaire in July 2012. Chi-square test and Fisher exact test were used to identify differences of attitudes about the exam and training between the rural doctors and certified (assistant) doctors. Longitudinal annual statistics (1980-2014) of village doctors were further analyzed. Eight hundred and forty-four village doctors were asked to participate, and 837 (99.17%) responded. Only 14.93% of the respondents had received physician (assistant) certification. Only 49.45% of the village doctors thought that the areas tested by the certification exam were closely related to the healthcare needs of rural populations. The majority (86.19%) felt that the training program was "very helpful" or "helpful" for preparing for the exam. More than half the village doctors (61.46%) attended the "weekly school". The village doctors considered the most effective method of learning was "continuous training (40.36%)" . The majority of the rural doctors (89.91%) said they would be willing to participate in the training and 96.87% stated that they could afford to pay up to 2000 yuan for it. The majority of village doctors in Changzhou City perceived that neither the certification exam nor the training for it are closely related to the actual healthcare needs of rural residents. Policies and programs should focus on providing exam-preparation training for selected rural doctors, reducing training expenditures, and utilizing web-based methods. The training focused on rural practice should be provided to all village doctors, even certified physicians. The government should also adjust the local licensing requirements to attract and recruit new village doctors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 13%
Student > Master 5 11%
Other 3 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 15 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 15 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 May 2018.
All research outputs
#7,295,430
of 12,936,827 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#1,034
of 1,844 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,013
of 269,911 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,936,827 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,844 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,911 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them