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Consequences of high-sensitivity troponin T testing applied in a primary care population with chest pain compared with a commercially available point-of-care troponin T analysis: an observational…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, June 2015
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  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
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1 tweeter

Citations

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16 Dimensions

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Consequences of high-sensitivity troponin T testing applied in a primary care population with chest pain compared with a commercially available point-of-care troponin T analysis: an observational prospective study
Published in
BMC Research Notes, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1174-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Per O Andersson, Jan-Erik Karlsson, Eva Landberg, Karin Festin, Staffan Nilsson

Abstract

There is a demand for a highly sensitive and specific point-of care test to detect acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It is unclear if a high-sensitivity troponin assay will have enough discriminative power to become a decision support in primary care. The aim of this study was to evaluate a high-sensitivity troponin T assay performed in three primary health care centres in southeast Sweden and to compare the outcome with a point-of-care troponin T test. This study included 115 patients who consulted their general practitioner for chest pain, dyspnoea on exertion, unexplained weakness and/or fatigue in the last 7 days. Troponin T was analysed by a point-of-care test and a high-sensitivity method together with N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and creatinine. All patients were checked for AMI or unstable angina (UA) within 30 days of study enrolment. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was carried out to examine possible connections between troponin T ≥ 15 ng/L, clinical variables and laboratory findings at baseline. In addition, 21 patients with troponin T ≥ 15 ng/L and no signs of AMI or UA were followed up for 2-3 years. Three patients were diagnosed with AMI and three with UA. At the ≥ 15 ng/L cut-off, the troponin T method had 100% sensitivity, 75% specificity for AMI and a positive predictive value of 10%. The troponin T point-of-care test missed one case of AMI and the detection limit was 50 ng/L. Troponin T ≥ 15 ng/L was correlated to age ≥65 years (odds ratio (OR), 10.9 95% CI 2.28-51.8) and NT-proBNP in accordance with heart failure (OR 8.62 95% CI 1.61-46.1). Fourteen of the 21 patients, without signs of AMI or UA at baseline, still had increased troponin T at follow-up after 2-3 years. A high-sensitivity troponin T assay could become useful in primary care as a point-of-care test for patients <65 years. For patients older than 65-70 years, a higher decision limit than ≥15 ng/L should be considered and used in conjunction with clinical parameters and possibly with NT-proBNP.

Twitter Demographics

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 20%
Student > Bachelor 9 18%
Researcher 9 18%
Student > Postgraduate 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 51%
Unspecified 3 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 11 22%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 March 2016.
All research outputs
#6,453,990
of 22,919,505 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,005
of 4,276 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,675
of 267,250 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#12
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,919,505 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,276 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,250 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.