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A fatal case associated with respiratory syncytial virus infection in a young child

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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87 Mendeley
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Title
A fatal case associated with respiratory syncytial virus infection in a young child
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12879-018-3123-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lili Xu, Hengmiao Gao, Jiansheng Zeng, Jun Liu, Cong Lu, Xiaolei Guan, Suyun Qian, Zhengde Xie

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of pediatric bronchiolitis and pneumonia worldwide. Risk factors for high mortality and prolonged morbidity after RSV infection include premature birth, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, congenital heart disease, and Down syndrome. However, some previously healthy, full-term children who are infected with RSV also require hospitalization and even experience severe sequelae or death. In this report, we present the case of an RSV-associated death of a child who was born at full-term and developed normally up to the age of 2 years old. Cardiopulmonary arrest occurred within 3 days after the onset of symptoms, which included cough and high fever. Complete brain edema was prominent, and encephalopathy was developing. Viral antigen detection and microbiome analyses of oral swab and nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens verified an RSV infection, while bacterial culture of blood specimens yielded negative results. The RSV strain detected in this patient was subtyped as RSVB9, and no mutation was found in the six antigenic sites for targeted drugs or vaccines. The patient had a severe infection associated with RSV, which was very likely the cause of her central nervous system infection and acute neurological complications.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 87 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 17 20%
Researcher 11 13%
Student > Master 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 7%
Other 12 14%
Unknown 27 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 3%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 31 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2020.
All research outputs
#12,146,521
of 21,730,136 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,756
of 7,400 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#135,964
of 298,009 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,730,136 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,400 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,009 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them