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Cortical reorganisation of cerebral networks after childhood stroke: impact on outcome

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neurology, June 2015
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Title
Cortical reorganisation of cerebral networks after childhood stroke: impact on outcome
Published in
BMC Neurology, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12883-015-0309-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Salome Kornfeld, Juan Antonio Delgado Rodríguez, Regula Everts, Alain Kaelin-Lang, Roland Wiest, Christian Weisstanner, Pasquale Mordasini, Maja Steinlin, Sebastian Grunt

Abstract

Recovery after arterial ischaemic stroke is known to largely depend on the plastic properties of the brain. The present study examines changes in the network topography of the developing brain after stroke. Effects of brain damage are best assessed by examining entire networks rather than single sites of structural lesions. Relating these changes to post-stroke neuropsychological variables and motor abilities will improve understanding of functional plasticity after stroke. Inclusion of healthy controls will provide additional insight into children's normal brain development. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging is a valid approach to topographically investigate the reorganisation of functional networks after a brain lesion. Transcranial magnetic stimulation provides complementary output information. This study will investigate functional reorganisation after paediatric arterial ischaemic stroke by means of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation in a cross-sectional plus longitudinal study design. The general aim of this study is to better understand neuroplasticity of the developing brain after stroke in order to develop more efficacious therapy and to improve the post-stroke functional outcome. The cross-sectional part of the study will investigate the functional cerebral networks of 35 children with chronic arterial ischaemic stroke (time of the lesion >2 years). In the longitudinal part, 15 children with acute arterial ischaemic stroke (shortly after the acute phase of the stroke) will be included and investigations will be performed 3 times within the subsequent 9 months. We will also recruit 50 healthy controls, matched for age and sex. The neuroimaging and neurophysiological data will be correlated with neuropsychological and neurological variables. This study is the first to combine resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation in a paediatric population diagnosed with arterial ischaemic stroke. Thus, this study has the potential to uniquely contribute to the understanding of neuronal plasticity in the brains of healthy children and those with acute or chronic brain injury. It is expected that the results will lead to the development of optimal interventions after arterial ischaemic stroke.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 93 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 93 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 19%
Researcher 16 17%
Student > Bachelor 12 13%
Student > Master 11 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 17 18%
Unknown 13 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 20%
Neuroscience 16 17%
Psychology 15 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Other 15 16%
Unknown 19 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 March 2016.
All research outputs
#5,648,881
of 7,465,518 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neurology
#938
of 1,155 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,925
of 218,864 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neurology
#33
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,465,518 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,155 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 218,864 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.