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Validity evidence for the Hamburg multiple mini-interview

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, May 2018
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Title
Validity evidence for the Hamburg multiple mini-interview
Published in
BMC Medical Education, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12909-018-1208-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mirjana Knorr, Anja Schwibbe, Maren Ehrhardt, Janina Lackamp, Stefan Zimmermann, Wolfgang Hampe

Abstract

Multiple mini-interviews (MMI) become increasingly popular for the selection of medical students. In this work, we examine the validity evidence for the Hamburg MMI. We conducted three follow-up studies for the 2014 cohort of applicants to medical school over the course of two years. We calculated Spearman's rank correlation (ρ) between MMI results and (1) emotional intelligence measured by the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue-SF) and the Situational Test of Emotion Management (STEM), (2) supervisors' and practice team members' evaluations of psychosocial competencies and suitability for the medical profession after a one-week 1:1 teaching in a general practice (GP) and (3) objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) scores. There were no significant correlations between MMI results and the TEIQue-SF (ρ = .07, p > .05) or the STEM (ρ = .05, p > .05). MMI results could significantly predict GP evaluations of psychosocial competencies (ρ = .32, p < .05) and suitability for the medical profession (ρ = .42, p < .01) as well as OSCE scores (ρ = .23, p < .05). The MMI remained a significant predictor of these outcomes in a robust regression model including gender and age as control variables. Our findings suggest that MMIs can measure competencies that are relevant in a practical context. However, these competencies do not seem to be related to emotional intelligence as measured by self-report or situational judgement test.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 7 12%
Lecturer 4 7%
Researcher 4 7%
Professor 4 7%
Other 17 29%
Unknown 16 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 22%
Psychology 13 22%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Unspecified 2 3%
Arts and Humanities 2 3%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 18 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 June 2018.
All research outputs
#8,208,685
of 13,093,005 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#1,304
of 1,894 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#161,003
of 269,929 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,093,005 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,894 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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