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Baby-led weaning: what a systematic review of the literature adds on

Overview of attention for article published in Italian Journal of Pediatrics, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 953)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
493 Mendeley
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Title
Baby-led weaning: what a systematic review of the literature adds on
Published in
Italian Journal of Pediatrics, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13052-018-0487-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Enza D’Auria, Marcello Bergamini, Annamaria Staiano, Giuseppe Banderali, Erica Pendezza, Francesca Penagini, Gian Vincenzo Zuccotti, Diego Giampietro Peroni

Abstract

The term weaning describes the time period in which a progressive reduction of breastfeeding or the feeding of infant-formula takes place while the infant is gradually introduced to solid foods. It is a crucial time in an infant's life as not only does it involve with a great deal of rapid change for the child, but it is also associated with the development of food preferences, eating behaviours and body weight in childhood and also in adolescence and adulthood.Therefore, how a child is weaned may have an influence later, on the individual's entire life. Babies are traditionally first introduced to solid foods using spoon-feeding, in most countries.Beside to traditional approach, an alternative method, promoting infant self-feeding from six months of age, called baby-led weaning or "auto-weaning", has grown in popularity. This approach causes concern to healthy professionals and parents themselves as data from observational studies pointed out to a potential risk of iron and energy inadequacy as well as choking risk. Aim of this systematic review was to critically examine the current evidence about baby-led weaning approach and to explore the need for future research.A systematic search was conducted in Cochrane library databases and DARE (Database of Abstract of Reviews of Effects), EMBASE and MEDLINE in the period 2000-2018 (up to March 1st) to address some key questions on baby-led weaning. Prisma guidelines for systematic reviews has been followed.After the inclusion/exclusion process, we included for analysis of evidence 12 articles, 10 observational cross-sectional studies and 2 randomized controlled trials. Pooling of results from very different outcomes in the studies included was not possible. Both randomized trials have potential bias; therefore, the quality of the evidence is low.There are still major unresolved issues about baby-led weaning that require answers from research and that should be considered when advices are requested from health professionals by parents willing to approach this method.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 493 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 493 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 82 17%
Student > Master 51 10%
Unspecified 33 7%
Student > Postgraduate 31 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 5%
Other 82 17%
Unknown 189 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 127 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 78 16%
Unspecified 36 7%
Social Sciences 10 2%
Psychology 8 2%
Other 40 8%
Unknown 194 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 112. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2023.
All research outputs
#317,244
of 22,996,001 outputs
Outputs from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#8
of 953 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,053
of 326,306 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#2
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,996,001 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 953 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 326,306 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.