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Gestational diabetes is associated with change in the gut microbiota composition in third trimester of pregnancy and postpartum

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
41 tweeters
facebook
10 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
136 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
222 Mendeley
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Title
Gestational diabetes is associated with change in the gut microbiota composition in third trimester of pregnancy and postpartum
Published in
Microbiome, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40168-018-0472-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mie Korslund Wiinblad Crusell, Tue Haldor Hansen, Trine Nielsen, Kristine Højgaard Allin, Malte C. Rühlemann, Peter Damm, Henrik Vestergaard, Christina Rørbye, Niklas Rye Jørgensen, Ole Bjarne Christiansen, Femke-Anouska Heinsen, Andre Franke, Torben Hansen, Jeannet Lauenborg, Oluf Pedersen

Abstract

Imbalances of gut microbiota composition are linked to a range of metabolic perturbations. In the present study, we examined the gut microbiota of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and normoglycaemic pregnant women in late pregnancy and about 8 months postpartum. Gut microbiota profiles of women with GDM (n = 50) and healthy (n = 157) pregnant women in the third trimester and 8 months postpartum were assessed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of the V1-V2 region. Insulin and glucose homeostasis were evaluated by a 75 g 2-h oral glucose tolerance test during and after pregnancy. Gut microbiota of women with GDM was aberrant at multiple levels, including phylum and genus levels, compared with normoglycaemic pregnant women. Actinobacteria at phylum level and Collinsella, Rothia and Desulfovibrio at genus level had a higher abundance in the GDM cohort. Difference in abundance of 17 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) during pregnancy was associated with GDM. After adjustment for pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), 5 of the 17 OTUs showed differential abundance in the GDM cohort compared with the normoglycaemic pregnant women with enrichment of species annotated to Faecalibacterium and Anaerotruncus and depletion of species annotated to Clostridium (sensu stricto) and to Veillonella. OTUs assigned to Akkermansia were associated with lower insulin sensitivity while Christensenella OTUs were associated with higher fasting plasma glucose concentration. OTU richness and Shannon index decreased from late pregnancy to postpartum regardless of metabolic status. About 8 months after delivery, the microbiota of women with previous GDM was still characterised by an aberrant composition. Thirteen OTUs were differentially abundant in women with previous GDM compared with women with previous normoglycaemic pregnancy. GDM diagnosed in the third trimester of pregnancy is associated with a disrupted gut microbiota composition compared with normoglycaemic pregnant women, and 8 months after pregnancy, differences in the gut microbiota signatures are still detectable. The gut microbiota composition of women with GDM, both during and after pregnancy, resembles the aberrant microbiota composition reported in non-pregnant individuals with type 2 diabetes and associated intermediary metabolic traits.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 41 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 222 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 222 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 34 15%
Student > Master 34 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 12%
Student > Bachelor 27 12%
Other 14 6%
Other 35 16%
Unknown 51 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 40 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 38 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 18 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 7%
Other 30 14%
Unknown 61 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2019.
All research outputs
#691,027
of 16,575,518 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#217
of 952 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,165
of 283,143 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,575,518 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 952 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,143 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them