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Development and implementation of a geographical area categorisation method with targeted performance indicators for nationwide EMS in Finland

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Development and implementation of a geographical area categorisation method with targeted performance indicators for nationwide EMS in Finland
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13049-018-0506-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jukka Pappinen, Päivi Laukkanen-Nevala, Pekka Mäntyselkä, Jouni Kurola

Abstract

In Finland, hospital districts (HD) are required by law to determine the level and availability of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) for each 1-km2 sized area (cell) within their administrative area. The cells are currently categorised into five risk categories based on the predicted number of missions. Methodological defects and insufficient instructions have led to incomparability between EMS services. The aim of this study was to describe a new, nationwide method for categorising the cells, analyse EMS response time data and describe possible differences in mission profiles between the new risk category areas. National databases of EMS missions, population and buildings were combined with an existing nationwide 1-km2 hexagon-shaped cell grid. The cells were categorised into four groups, based on the Finnish Environment Institute's (FEI) national definition of urban and rural areas, population and historical EMS mission density within each cell. The EMS mission profiles of the cell categories were compared using risk ratios with confidence intervals in 12 mission groups. In total, 87.3% of the population lives and 87.5% of missions took place in core or other urban areas, which covered only 4.7% of the HDs' surface area. Trauma mission incidence per 1000 inhabitants was higher in core urban areas (42.2) than in other urban (24.2) or dispersed settlement areas (24.6). The results were similar for non-trauma missions (134.8, 93.2 and 92.2, respectively). Each cell category had a characteristic mission profile. High-energy trauma missions and cardiac problems were more common in rural and uninhabited cells, while violence, intoxication and non-specific problems dominated in urban areas. The proposed area categories and grid-based data collection appear to be a useful method for evaluating EMS demand and availability in different parts of the country for statistical purposes. Due to a similar rural/urban area definition, the method might also be usable for comparison between the Nordic countries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 22%
Student > Master 5 22%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Researcher 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 5 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 13%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Computer Science 1 4%
Arts and Humanities 1 4%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 7 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 March 2021.
All research outputs
#1,923,110
of 21,752,314 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#184
of 1,230 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,091
of 298,631 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,752,314 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,230 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,631 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them