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Effects of hypertonic saline and mannitol on cortical cerebral microcirculation in a rabbit craniotomy model

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Anesthesiology, June 2015
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Title
Effects of hypertonic saline and mannitol on cortical cerebral microcirculation in a rabbit craniotomy model
Published in
BMC Anesthesiology, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12871-015-0067-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pavel Dostal, Jitka Schreiberova, Vlasta Dostalova, Vlasta Dostalova, Tomas Tyll, Jiri Paral, Islam Abdo, Miroslav Cihlo, David Astapenko, Zdenek Turek

Abstract

Hyperosmolar solutions have been used in neurosurgery to modify brain bulk and prevent neurological deterioration. The aim of this animal study was to compare the short-term effects of equivolemic, equiosmolar solutions of mannitol and hypertonic saline (HTS) on cerebral cortical microcirculation in a rabbit craniotomy model. Rabbits (weight, 2.0-3.0 kg) were anesthetized, ventilated mechanically, and subjected to a craniotomy. The animals were allocated randomly to receive a 3.75 ml/kg intravenous infusion of either 3.2 % HTS (group HTS, n = 8) or 20 % mannitol (group MTL, n = 8). Microcirculation in the cerebral cortex was evaluated using sidestream dark-field (SDF) imaging before and 20 min after the end of the 15-min HTS infusion. Global hemodynamic data were recorded, and blood samples for laboratory analysis were obtained at the time of SDF image recording. No differences in the microcirculatory parameters were observed between the groups before the use of osmotherapy. After osmotherapy, lower proportions of perfused small vessel density (P = 0.0474), perfused vessel density (P = 0.0457), and microvascular flow index (P = 0.0207) were observed in the MTL group compared with those in the HTS group. Our findings suggest that an equivolemic, equiosmolar HTS solution better preserves perfusion of cortical brain microcirculation compared to MTL in a rabbit craniotomy model.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Czechia 1 4%
Unknown 22 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 13%
Other 3 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Professor 2 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Other 5 22%
Unknown 6 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 13%
Neuroscience 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 6 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2016.
All research outputs
#18,414,796
of 22,811,321 outputs
Outputs from BMC Anesthesiology
#990
of 1,496 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,180
of 266,423 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Anesthesiology
#14
of 26 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,496 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.