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Feasibility and acceptability of PrE-operative Physical Activity to improve patient outcomes After major cancer surgery: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial (PEPA Trial)

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, February 2018
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

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136 Mendeley
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Title
Feasibility and acceptability of PrE-operative Physical Activity to improve patient outcomes After major cancer surgery: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial (PEPA Trial)
Published in
Trials, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13063-018-2481-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Steffens, Jane Young, Paula R. Beckenkamp, James Ratcliffe, Freya Rubie, Nabila Ansari, Neil Pillinger, Michael Solomon

Abstract

There is a need for evidence of the effectiveness of pre-operative exercise for patients undergoing major cancer surgery; however, recruitment to such trials can be challenging. The PrE-operative Physical Activity (PEPA) Trial will establish the feasibility and acceptability of a pre-operative exercise programme aimed to improve patient outcomes after cytoreductive surgery and pelvic exenteration. The secondary aim is to obtain pilot data on the likely difference in key outcomes (post-operative complications, length of hospital stay, post-operative functional capacity and quality of life) to inform the sample size calculation for the substantive randomised clinical trial. Twenty patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery and pelvic exenteration at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney will be recruited and randomly allocated (1:1 ratio) to either 2 to 6 weeks' pre-operative exercise programme (intervention group) or usual care (control group). Those randomised to the intervention group will receive up to six individualised, 1-h physiotherapy sessions (including aerobic and endurance exercises, respiratory muscle exercises, stretching and flexibility exercises), home exercises (instruction and recommendations on how to progress the exercises at home) and encouragement to be more active by using an activity tracker to measure the number of steps walked daily. Patients allocated to the control group will not receive any specific advice about exercise training. Feasibility will be assessed with consent rates to the study, and for the intervention group, retention and adherence rates to the exercise programme. Acceptability of the exercise programme will be assessed with a semi-structured questionnaire. The following measures of the effectiveness of the intervention will be collected at baseline (2 to 6 weeks pre-operative), a week before surgery, during hospital stay and pre hospital discharge: post-operative complication rates (Clavien-Dindo), post-operative functional capacity (Six-minute Walk Test) and quality of life (SF-36v2®) and length of hospital stay. Functional status will be additionally measured using Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing (CPET), at baseline and within a week before surgery. The PEPA Trial will provide important information about the feasibility and acceptability of a pre-operative exercise programme for patients undergoing major cancer surgery. Data from the PEPA Trial will be used to inform the design, methodology and to calculate sample size required for a larger, definitive trial. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ID: ACTRN12617001129370 . Registered on 1 August 2017.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 136 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 136 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 16%
Student > Bachelor 13 10%
Student > Postgraduate 10 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 7%
Researcher 9 7%
Other 26 19%
Unknown 46 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 28 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 18%
Sports and Recreations 14 10%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Computer Science 3 2%
Other 9 7%
Unknown 54 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 February 2022.
All research outputs
#13,665,121
of 21,895,296 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#3,433
of 5,609 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#165,812
of 298,519 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,895,296 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,609 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,519 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them