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How do introgression events shape the partitioning of diversity among breeds: a case study in sheep

Overview of attention for article published in Genetics Selection Evolution, June 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

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1 policy source
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1 tweeter

Citations

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9 Dimensions

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18 Mendeley
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Title
How do introgression events shape the partitioning of diversity among breeds: a case study in sheep
Published in
Genetics Selection Evolution, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12711-015-0131-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Grégoire Leroy, Coralie Danchin-Burge, Isabelle Palhière, Magali SanCristobal, Yann Nédélec, Etienne Verrier, Xavier Rognon

Abstract

From domestication to the current pattern of differentiation, domestic species have been influenced by reticulate evolution with multiple events of migration, introgression, and isolation; this has resulted in a very large number of breeds. In order to manage these breeds and their genetic diversity, one must know the current genetic structure of the populations and the relationships among these. This paper presents the results of a genetic diversity analysis on an almost exhaustive sample of the sheep breeds reared in France. Molecular characterization was performed with a set of 21 microsatellite markers on a collection of 49 breeds that include five breed types: meat, hardy meat, dairy, high prolificacy and patrimonial breeds. Values of expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.48 to 0.76 depending on the breed, with specialized meat breeds exhibiting the lowest values. Neighbor-Net, multidimensional analysis or clustering approaches revealed a clear differentiation of the meat breeds compared to the other breed types. Moreover, the group that clustered meat breeds included all the breeds that originated from the United Kingdom (UK) and those that originated from crossbreeding between UK breeds and French local breeds. We also highlighted old genetic introgression events that were related to the diffusion of Merino rams to improve wool production. As a result of these introgression events, especially that regarding the UK breeds, the breeds that were clustered in the 'meat type cluster' exhibited the lowest contribution to total diversity. That means that similar allelic combinations could be observed in different breeds of this group. The genetic differentiation pattern of the sheep breeds reared in France results from a combination of factors, i.e. geographical origin, historic gene flow, and breed use. The Merino influence is weaker than that of UK breeds, which is consistent with how sheep use changed radically at the end of 19(th) century when wool-producing animals (Merino-like) were replaced by meat-producing breeds. These results are highly relevant to monitor and manage the genetic diversity of sheep and can be used to set priorities in conservation programs when needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Finland 1 6%
Unknown 17 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 17%
Student > Master 3 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 3 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 67%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Chemistry 1 6%
Unknown 4 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2016.
All research outputs
#2,071,997
of 8,605,160 outputs
Outputs from Genetics Selection Evolution
#67
of 325 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,230
of 230,350 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genetics Selection Evolution
#3
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,605,160 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 325 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,350 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.