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Athletic equipment microbiota are shaped by interactions with human skin

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
17 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
91 Mendeley
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Title
Athletic equipment microbiota are shaped by interactions with human skin
Published in
Microbiome, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40168-015-0088-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mariah Wood, Sean M. Gibbons, Simon Lax, Tifani W. Eshoo-Anton, Sarah M. Owens, Suzanne Kennedy, Jack A. Gilbert, Jarrad T. Hampton-Marcell

Abstract

Americans spend the vast majority of their lives in built environments. Even traditionally outdoor pursuits, such as exercising, are often now performed indoors. Bacteria that colonize these indoor ecosystems are primarily derived from the human microbiome. The modes of human interaction with indoor surfaces and the physical conditions associated with each surface type determine the steady-state ecology of the microbial community. Bacterial assemblages associated with different surfaces in three athletic facilities, including floors, mats, benches, free weights, and elliptical handles, were sampled every other hour (8 am to 6 pm) for 2 days. Surface and equipment type had a stronger influence on bacterial community composition than the facility in which they were housed. Surfaces that were primarily in contact with human skin exhibited highly dynamic bacterial community composition and non-random co-occurrence patterns, suggesting that different host microbiomes-shaped by selective forces-were being deposited on these surfaces through time. However, bacterial assemblages found on the floors and mats changed less over time, and species co-occurrence patterns appeared random, suggesting more neutral community assembly. These longitudinal patterns highlight the dramatic turnover of microbial communities on surfaces in regular contact with human skin. By uncovering these longitudinal patterns, this study promotes a better understanding of microbe-human interactions within the built environment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Vietnam 1 1%
Unknown 87 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 20%
Student > Bachelor 16 18%
Researcher 15 16%
Student > Master 9 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 17 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 35%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 15%
Engineering 6 7%
Environmental Science 6 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 5%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 19 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 49. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2020.
All research outputs
#583,869
of 19,293,994 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#162
of 1,168 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,378
of 243,244 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,293,994 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,168 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,244 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them