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Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), January 2003
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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188 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
150 Mendeley
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Title
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), January 2003
DOI 10.1186/gb-2003-4-3-r19
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eugene V Koonin, Kira S Makarova, Igor B Rogozin, Laetitia Davidovic, Marie-Claude Letellier, Luca Pellegrini

Abstract

The rhomboid family of polytopic membrane proteins shows a level of evolutionary conservation unique among membrane proteins. They are present in nearly all the sequenced genomes of archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes, with the exception of several species with small genomes. On the basis of experimental studies with the developmental regulator rhomboid from Drosophila and the AarA protein from the bacterium Providencia stuartii, the rhomboids are thought to be intramembrane serine proteases whose signaling function is conserved in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Phylogenetic tree analysis carried out using several independent methods for tree constructions and the corresponding statistical tests suggests that, despite its broad distribution in all three superkingdoms, the rhomboid family was not present in the last universal common ancestor of extant life forms. Instead, we propose that rhomboids evolved in bacteria and have been acquired by archaea and eukaryotes through several independent horizontal gene transfers. In eukaryotes, two distinct, ancient acquisitions apparently gave rise to the two major subfamilies, typified by rhomboid and PARL (presenilins-associated rhomboid-like protein), respectively. Subsequent evolution of the rhomboid family in eukaryotes proceeded by multiple duplications and functional diversification through the addition of extra transmembrane helices and other domains in different orientations relative to the conserved core that harbors the protease activity. Although the near-universal presence of the rhomboid family in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes appears to suggest that this protein is part of the heritage of the last universal common ancestor, phylogenetic tree analysis indicates a likely bacterial origin with subsequent dissemination by horizontal gene transfer. This emphasizes the importance of explicit phylogenetic analysis for the reconstruction of ancestral life forms. A hypothetical scenario for the origin of intracellular membrane proteases from membrane transporters is proposed.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 150 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 1%
United Kingdom 2 1%
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Unknown 143 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 30 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 19%
Researcher 24 16%
Student > Bachelor 17 11%
Professor 9 6%
Other 21 14%
Unknown 21 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 65 43%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 34 23%
Chemistry 9 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 4%
Neuroscience 3 2%
Other 7 5%
Unknown 26 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 November 2019.
All research outputs
#1,267,721
of 5,114,553 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#1,319
of 1,960 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,200
of 181,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#56
of 72 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,114,553 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 63rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,960 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.8. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 181,313 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 72 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.