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‘Researchers have love for life’: opportunities and barriers to engage pregnant women in malaria research in post-Ebola Liberia

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, April 2018
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Title
‘Researchers have love for life’: opportunities and barriers to engage pregnant women in malaria research in post-Ebola Liberia
Published in
Malaria Journal, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2292-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Guillermo Martínez Pérez, Christine K. Tarr-Attia, Bondey Breeze-Barry, Adelaida Sarukhan, Dawoh Peter Lansana, Ana Meyer García-Sípido, Anna Rosés, María Maixenchs, Quique Bassat, Alfredo Mayor

Abstract

Adoption of prevention and therapeutic innovations to ensure that National Malaria Control Programmes meet their incidence reduction targets is highly dependent on the conduct of rigorous clinical trials. In Liberia, malaria control virtually halted during the recent Ebola epidemic, and could enormously benefit from innovations to protect its most vulnerable populations, including pregnant women, against malaria. Health policy-planners could feel more inclined to adopt novel interventions with demonstrated safety and efficacy when trialled among their women population. However, pregnant women are especially vulnerable when targeted as research participants. Whilst some studies in the region attempted to understand the ethical issues around the conduct of clinical research, there is need of such information from Liberia to inform future malaria research. This is a grounded theory study that aims to understand the barriers and opportunities for pregnant women to consent to participate in malaria research in Liberia. The study was conducted between November 2016 and May 2017 at the St Joseph's Catholic Hospital, Monrovia. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were held with hospital staff, traditional community representatives, and pregnant women. According to the participants, useful strategies to motivate pregnant women to consent to participate in malaria research could be providing evidence-based education on malaria and research to the general population and encouraging engagement of traditional leaders in research design and community mobilization. Fears and suspicions towards research and researchers, which were amplified during the conduct of Ebola vaccine and drug clinical trials, may influence women's acceptance and willingness to engage in malaria research. Population's mistrust in the public healthcare system might hinder their acceptance of research, undermining the probability of their benefiting from any improved malaria control intervention. Benchmarking for acceptable practices from previous public health interventions; building community discussion and dissemination platforms; and mapping communication and information errors from how previous research interventions were explained to the Liberian population, are strategies that might help ensure a safe and fully informed participation of pregnant women in malaria research. Inequity issues impeding access and use of biomedical care for women must be tackled urgently.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 108 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 26%
Researcher 16 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 9%
Student > Bachelor 7 6%
Librarian 5 5%
Other 16 15%
Unknown 26 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 15%
Social Sciences 10 9%
Psychology 4 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 2%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 32 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 May 2018.
All research outputs
#10,340,591
of 12,961,138 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#3,288
of 3,803 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,529
of 270,079 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,961,138 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,803 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,079 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them