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Predicting patient post-detoxification engagement in 12-step groups with an extended version of the theory of planned behavior

Overview of attention for article published in Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, June 2015
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1 tweeter

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Title
Predicting patient post-detoxification engagement in 12-step groups with an extended version of the theory of planned behavior
Published in
Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13722-015-0036-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

John-Kåre Vederhus, Sarah E. Zemore, Jostein Rise, Thomas Clausen, Magnhild Høie

Abstract

Individuals with substance use disorders can receive important abstinence-specific support in 12-step groups (TSGs). However, our understanding of key factors that influence TSG participation remains limited. This study used an extended version of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to enhance the understanding of TSG affiliation. Data were retrieved from a controlled trial of a 12-step facilitation intervention conducted on an inpatient detoxification ward in Norway (N = 140). Surveys at baseline included a TPB questionnaire. The behavioral target was to attend at least two TSG meetings per month in the 6-month follow-up period. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the predictors of behavior at follow-up. We found that attitudes, the moral norm, and perceived behavior control accounted for 81 % of the variance in the intention to participate regularly in TSGs after treatment. Subjective norms did not significantly influence the intention to participate. Moreover, the intention to participate significantly predicted behavior (β = 0.42, p < 0.001). In contrast to theory, there was a substantial, model-independent pathway from past to later behavior (β = 0.22, p = 0.047). The model explained 46 % (p < 0.001) of the variance in behavior. Attending ≥ 12 TSG meetings in the follow-up period was associated with a high percentage of abstinent days at follow-up (β = 0.38, p = 0.023). The present TPB questionnaire worked well for assessing patient intentions to attend a TSG. Treatment providers should encourage patient intentions to participate in TSGs post-detoxification.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 20%
Student > Postgraduate 4 10%
Researcher 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 7 18%
Unknown 10 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 6 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 10%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 5%
Other 8 20%
Unknown 12 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2015.
All research outputs
#2,785,137
of 5,251,998 outputs
Outputs from Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
#87
of 129 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,298
of 184,508 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
#4
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,251,998 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 129 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 184,508 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.