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Empowering families by engaging and relating Murri way: a grounded theory study of the implementation of the Cape York Baby Basket program

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, May 2015
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1 tweeter

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Title
Empowering families by engaging and relating Murri way: a grounded theory study of the implementation of the Cape York Baby Basket program
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0543-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Janya McCalman, Andrew Searles, Roxanne Bainbridge, Rachael Ham, Jacki Mein, Johanna Neville, Sandra Campbell, Komla Tsey

Abstract

Evaluating program outcomes without considering how the program was implemented can cause misunderstandings and inefficiencies when initiating program improvements. In conjunction with a program evaluation, reported elsewhere, this paper theorises the process of implementing an Indigenous Australian maternal and child health program. The Baby Basket program was developed in 2009 for the remote Cape York region and aimed to improve the attendance and engagement of Indigenous women at antenatal and postnatal clinics through providing three baskets of maternal and baby goods and associated health education. Constructivist grounded theory methods were used to generate and analyse data from qualitative interviews and focus groups with Indigenous women who received the baskets, their extended family members, and healthcare workers who delivered them. Data was coded in NVivo with concepts iteratively compared until higher order constructs and their relationships could be modelled to explain the common purpose for participants, the process involved in achieving that purpose, key strategies, conditions and outcomes. Theoretical terms are italicised. Program implementation entailed empowering families through a process of engaging and relating Murri (Queensland Indigenous) way. Key influencing conditions of the social environment were the remoteness of communities, keeping up with demand, families' knowledge, skills and roles and organisational service approaches and capacities. Engaging and relating Murri way occurred through four strategies: connecting through practical support, creating a culturally safe practice, becoming informed and informing others, and linking at the clinic. These strategies resulted in women and families taking responsibility for health through making healthy choices, becoming empowered health consumers and advocating for community changes. The theoretical model was applied to improve and revise Baby Basket program implementation, including increased recognition of the importance of empowering families by extending the home visiting approach up to the child's third birthday. Engaging and relating Murri way was strengthened by formal recognition and training of Indigenous health workers as program leaders. This theoretical model of program implementation was therefore useful for guiding program improvements, and could be applicable to other Indigenous maternal and child health programs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 169 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 168 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Lecturer 25 15%
Student > Master 25 15%
Student > Bachelor 17 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 9%
Researcher 12 7%
Other 38 22%
Unknown 36 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 47 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 12%
Social Sciences 18 11%
Psychology 9 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 2%
Other 24 14%
Unknown 46 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 June 2015.
All research outputs
#18,417,643
of 22,815,414 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#3,471
of 4,191 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,833
of 266,725 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#61
of 71 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,815,414 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,191 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,725 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 71 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.