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The role of juvenile hormone and insulin/TOR signaling in the growth of Manduca sexta

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, June 2015
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Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

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52 Mendeley
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Title
The role of juvenile hormone and insulin/TOR signaling in the growth of Manduca sexta
Published in
BMC Biology, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12915-015-0155-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicole E. Hatem, Zhou Wang, Keelin B. Nave, Takashi Koyama, Yuichiro Suzuki

Abstract

In many insect species, fitness trade-offs exist between maximizing body size and developmental speed. Understanding how various species evolve different life history strategies requires knowledge of the physiological mechanisms underlying the regulation of body size and developmental timing. Here the roles of juvenile hormone (JH) and insulin/TOR signaling in the regulation of the final body size were examined in the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. Feeding rapamycin to wildtype larvae decreased the growth rate but did not alter the peak size of the larva. In contrast, feeding rapamycin to the JH-deficient black mutant larvae caused the larvae to significantly increase the peak size relative to the DMSO-fed control animals by lengthening the terminal growth period. Furthermore, the critical weight was unaltered by feeding rapamycin, indicating that in Manduca, the critical weight is not influenced by insulin/TOR signaling. In addition, post-critical weight starved black mutant Manduca fed rapamycin underwent metamorphosis sooner than those that were fed, mimicking the so-called 'bail-out mechanism'. Our study demonstrates that JH masks the effects of insulin/TOR signaling in the determination of the final body size and that the critical weights in Drosophila and Manduca rely on distinct mechanisms that reflect different life history strategies. Our study also suggests that TOR signaling lengthens the terminal growth period in Manduca as it does in Drosophila, and that JH levels determine the relative contributions of nutrient- and body size-sensing pathways to metamorphic timing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 51 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 29%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Student > Master 6 12%
Professor 4 8%
Other 10 19%
Unknown 4 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 52%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 31%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Psychology 1 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 4 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 April 2016.
All research outputs
#2,904,400
of 7,506,617 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#555
of 832 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,698
of 225,708 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#19
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,506,617 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 61st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 832 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.9. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 225,708 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.