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Targeting male mosquito mating behaviour for malaria control

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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88 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
212 Mendeley
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Title
Targeting male mosquito mating behaviour for malaria control
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-0961-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Abdoulaye Diabate, Frédéric Tripet

Abstract

Malaria vector control relies heavily on the use of Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets (LLINs) and Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS). These, together with the combined drug administration efforts to control malaria, have reduced the death toll to less than 700,000 deaths/year. This progress has engendered real excitement but the emergence and spread of insecticide resistance is challenging our ability to sustain and consolidate the substantial gains that have been made. Research is required to discover novel vector control tools that can supplement and improve the effectiveness of those currently available. Here, we argue that recent and continuing progress in our understanding of male mating biology is instrumental in the implementation of new approaches based on the release of either conventional sterile or genetically engineered males. Importantly, further knowledge of male biology could also lead to the development of new interventions, such as sound traps and male mass killing in swarms, and contribute to new population sampling tools. We review and discuss recent advances in the behavioural ecology of male mating with an emphasis on the potential applications that can be derived from such knowledge. We also highlight those aspects of male mating ecology that urgently require additional study in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 212 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 208 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 45 21%
Researcher 40 19%
Student > Master 31 15%
Student > Bachelor 30 14%
Student > Postgraduate 10 5%
Other 24 11%
Unknown 32 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 79 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 27 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 10%
Environmental Science 11 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 10 5%
Other 29 14%
Unknown 34 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 June 2015.
All research outputs
#8,480,874
of 15,030,944 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,757
of 4,047 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,434
of 233,552 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,030,944 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,047 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,552 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them