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Implementation of an electronic fingerprint-linked data collection system: a feasibility and acceptability study among Zambian female sex workers

Overview of attention for article published in Globalization and Health, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
125 Mendeley
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Title
Implementation of an electronic fingerprint-linked data collection system: a feasibility and acceptability study among Zambian female sex workers
Published in
Globalization and Health, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12992-015-0114-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kristin M. Wall, William Kilembe, Mubiana Inambao, Yi No Chen, Mwaka Mchoongo, Linda Kimaru, Yuna Tiffany Hammond, Tyronza Sharkey, Kalonde Malama, T. Roice Fulton, Alex Tran, Hanzunga Halumamba, Sarah Anderson, Nishant Kishore, Shawn Sarwar, Trisha Finnegan, David Mark, Susan A. Allen

Abstract

Patient identification within and between health services is an operational challenge in many resource-limited settings. When following HIV risk groups for service provision and in the context of vaccine trials, patient misidentification can harm patient care and bias trial outcomes. Electronic fingerprinting has been proposed to identify patients over time and link patient data between health services. The objective of this study was to determine 1) the feasibility of implementing an electronic-fingerprint linked data capture system in Zambia and 2) the acceptability of this system among a key HIV risk group: female sex workers (FSWs). Working with Biometrac, a US-based company providing biometric-linked healthcare platforms, an electronic fingerprint-linked data capture system was developed for use by field recruiters among Zambian FSWs. We evaluated the technical feasibility of the system for use in the field in Zambia and conducted a pilot study to determine the acceptability of the system, as well as barriers to uptake, among FSWs. We found that implementation of an electronic fingerprint-linked patient tracking and data collection system was feasible in this relatively resource-limited setting (false fingerprint matching rate of 1/1000 and false rejection rate of <1/10,000) and was acceptable among FSWs in a clinic setting (2 % refusals). However, our data indicate that less than half of FSWs are comfortable providing an electronic fingerprint when recruited while they are working. The most common reasons cited for not providing a fingerprint (lack of privacy/confidentiality issues while at work, typically at bars or lodges) could be addressed by recruiting women during less busy hours, in their own homes, in the presence of "Queen Mothers" (FSW organizers), or in the presence of a FSW that has already been fingerprinted. Our findings have major implications for key population research and improved health services provision. However, more work needs to be done to increase the acceptability of the electronic fingerprint-linked data capture system during field recruitment. This study indicated several potential avenues that will be explored to increase acceptability.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 125 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 125 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 33 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 19%
Researcher 15 12%
Student > Bachelor 10 8%
Student > Postgraduate 8 6%
Other 18 14%
Unknown 17 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 26%
Social Sciences 16 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 13%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 6 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 4%
Other 27 22%
Unknown 23 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2019.
All research outputs
#4,212,958
of 15,942,222 outputs
Outputs from Globalization and Health
#554
of 822 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,585
of 234,526 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Globalization and Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,942,222 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 822 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.6. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,526 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them