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Barriers and facilitators to patient retention in HIV care

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
137 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
277 Mendeley
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Title
Barriers and facilitators to patient retention in HIV care
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0990-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Baligh R. Yehia, Leslie Stewart, Florence Momplaisir, Aaloke Mody, Carol W. Holtzman, Lisa M. Jacobs, Janet Hines, Karam Mounzer, Karen Glanz, Joshua P. Metlay, Judy A. Shea

Abstract

Retention in HIV care improves survival and reduces the risk of HIV transmission to others. Multiple quantitative studies have described demographic and clinical characteristics associated with retention in HIV care. However, qualitative studies are needed to better understand barriers and facilitators. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 51 HIV-infected individuals, 25 who were retained in care and 26 not retained in care, from 3 urban clinics. Interview data were analyzed for themes using a modified grounded theory approach. Identified themes were compared between the two groups of interest: patients retained in care and those not retained in care. Overall, participants identified 12 barriers and 5 facilitators to retention in HIV care. On average, retained individuals provided 3 barriers, while persons not retained in care provided 5 barriers. Both groups commonly discussed depression/mental illness, feeling sick, and competing life activities as barriers. In addition, individuals not retained in care commonly reported expensive and unreliable transportation, stigma, and insufficient insurance as barriers. On average, participants in both groups referenced 2 facilitators, including the presence of social support, patient-friendly clinic services (transportation, co-location of services, scheduling/reminders), and positive relationships with providers and clinic staff. In our study, patients not retained in care faced more barriers, particularly social and structural barriers, than those retained in care. Developing care models where social and financial barriers are addressed, mental health and substance abuse treatment is integrated, and patient-friendly services are offered is important to keeping HIV-infected individuals engaged in care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 277 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 276 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 55 20%
Researcher 42 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 13%
Student > Bachelor 19 7%
Student > Postgraduate 18 6%
Other 62 22%
Unknown 44 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 72 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 48 17%
Social Sciences 33 12%
Psychology 16 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 3%
Other 44 16%
Unknown 56 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2017.
All research outputs
#457,651
of 11,753,826 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#68
of 4,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,989
of 236,335 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#4
of 122 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,753,826 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,390 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,335 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 122 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.