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Association between IL7R polymorphisms and severe liver disease in HIV/HCV coinfected patients: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, June 2015
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22 Mendeley
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Title
Association between IL7R polymorphisms and severe liver disease in HIV/HCV coinfected patients: a cross-sectional study
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12967-015-0577-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

María Guzmán-Fulgencio, Juan Berenguer, María A Jiménez-Sousa, Daniel Pineda-Tenor, Teresa Aldámiz-Echevarria, Pilar García-Broncano, Ana Carrero, Mónica García-Álvarez, Francisco Tejerina, Cristina Diez, Sonia Vazquez-Morón, Salvador Resino

Abstract

Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a critical factor for T cell development and for maintaining and restoring homeostasis of mature T cells. Polymorphisms at α-chain of the IL-7 receptor (IL7R or CD127) gene are related to evolution of HIV-infection, but there are no data concerning the evolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between IL7R polymorphisms and severe liver disease in HCV/HIV coinfected patients. We performed a cross-sectional study in 220 naïve patients who underwent a liver biopsy. IL7R polymorphisms (rs6897932, rs987106 and rs3194051) were genotyped using the GoldenGate(®) assay. The outcome variables were: (a) liver biopsy: advanced fibrosis (F ≥ 3), severe activity grade (A3); (b) non-invasive indexes: advanced fibrosis (APRI ≥1.5 and FIB-4 ≥3.25). Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association between IL7R polymorphisms and outcome variables. This test gives the differences between groups and the odds ratio (OR) for liver disease. Patients with rs6897932 CC genotype had higher likelihood of having A3 than patients with rs6897932 CT/TT (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 4.16; p = 0.026). Patients with rs987106 TT genotype had higher odds of having F ≥ 3 (aOR = 3.09; p = 0.009) than rs987106 AA/AT carriers. Finally, patients with rs3194051 AA genotype had higher odds of having severe liver fibrosis (F ≥ 3; APRI ≥1.5, and FIB4 ≥3.25) than patients with rs3194051 AG/GG genotype [aOR = 2.73 (p = 0.010); aOR = 2.52 (p = 0.029); and aOR = 4.01 (p = 0.027); respectively]. The CTA haplotype (comprised of rs6897932, rs987106, and rs3194051) carriers had higher odds of having F ≥ 3 (aOR = 1.85; p = 0.012), APRI ≥1.5 (aOR = 1.94; p = 0.023), and FIB4 ≥3.25 (aOR = 2.47; p = 0.024). Conversely, the CAG haplotype carriers had lower odds of having F ≥ 3 (aOR = 0.48; p = 0.011), APRI ≥1.5 (aOR = 0.48; p = 0.029), and FIB4 ≥3.25 (aOR = 0.29; p = 0.010). The presence of IL7R polymorphisms seems to be related to severe liver disease in HIV/HCV coinfected patients, because patients with unfavorable IL7R genotypes (rs6897932 CC, rs987106 TT, and rs3194051AA) had a worse prognosis of CHC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 23%
Student > Postgraduate 3 14%
Researcher 3 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 4 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 23%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 June 2015.
All research outputs
#2,443,871
of 5,296,399 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#556
of 1,488 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,302
of 186,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#51
of 99 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,296,399 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,488 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 186,796 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 99 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.