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Scabies: an ancient global disease with a need for new therapies

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
45 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
149 Mendeley
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Title
Scabies: an ancient global disease with a need for new therapies
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0983-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jackson Thomas, Greg M Peterson, Shelley F Walton, Christine F Carson, Mark Naunton, Kavya E Baby

Abstract

Scabies is an ancient disease (documented as far back as 2500 years ago). It affects about 300 million people annually worldwide, and the prevalence is as high as about 60 % in Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander children in Australia. This is more than six times the rate seen in the rest of the developed world. Scabies is frequently complicated by bacterial infection leading to the development of skin sores and other more serious consequences such as septicaemia and chronic heart and kidney diseases. This causes a substantial social and economic burden especially in resource poor communities around the world. Very few treatment options are currently available for the management of scabies infection. In this manuscript we briefly discuss the clinical consequences of scabies and the problems found (studies conducted in Australia) with the currently used topical and oral treatments. Current scabies treatment options are fairly ineffective in preventing treatment relapse, inflammatory skin reactions and associated bacterial skin infections. None have ovicidal, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and/or anti-pruritic properties. Treatments which are currently available for scabies can be problematic with adverse effects and perhaps of greater concern the risk of treatment failure. The development of new chemical entities is doubtful in the near future. Though there may be potential for immunological control, the development of a vaccine or other immunotherapy modalities may be decades away. The emergence of resistance among scabies mites to classical scabicides and ineffectiveness of current treatments (in reducing inflammatory skin reactions and secondary bacterial infections associated with scabies), raise serious concerns regarding current therapy. Treatment adherence difficulties, and safety and efficacy uncertainties in the young and elderly, all signal the need to identify new treatments for scabies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 149 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Nigeria 1 <1%
Mauritius 1 <1%
Unknown 147 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 25 17%
Student > Postgraduate 23 15%
Student > Master 23 15%
Researcher 15 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 7%
Other 26 17%
Unknown 27 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 68 46%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 3%
Other 21 14%
Unknown 29 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2018.
All research outputs
#741,663
of 13,698,878 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#129
of 5,097 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,706
of 232,045 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,698,878 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,097 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,045 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them