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A conceptual framework: the early and late phases of skeletal muscle dysfunction in the acute respiratory distress syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, December 2015
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

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74 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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133 Mendeley
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Title
A conceptual framework: the early and late phases of skeletal muscle dysfunction in the acute respiratory distress syndrome
Published in
Critical Care, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13054-015-0979-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

D. Clark Files, Michael A. Sanchez, Peter E. Morris

Abstract

Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) often develop severe diaphragmatic and limb skeletal muscle dysfunction. Impaired muscle function in ARDS is associated with increased mortality, increased duration of mechanical ventilation, and functional disability in survivors. In this review, we propose that muscle dysfunction in ARDS can be categorized into an early and a late phase. These early and late phases are based on the timing in relationship to lung injury and the underlying mechanisms. The early phase occurs temporally with the onset of lung injury, is driven by inflammation and disuse, and is marked predominantly by muscle atrophy from increased protein degradation. The ubiquitin-proteasome, autophagy, and calpain-caspase pathways have all been implicated in early-phase muscle dysfunction. Late-phase muscle weakness persists in many patients despite resolution of lung injury and cessation of ongoing acute inflammation-driven muscle atrophy. The clinical characteristics and mechanisms underlying late-phase muscle dysfunction do not involve the massive protein degradation and atrophy of the early phase and may reflect a failure of the musculoskeletal system to regain homeostatic balance. Owing to these underlying mechanistic differences, therapeutic interventions for treating muscle dysfunction in ARDS may differ during the early and late phases. Here, we review clinical and translational investigations of muscle dysfunction in ARDS, placing them in the conceptual framework of the early and late phases. We hypothesize that this conceptual model will aid in the design of future mechanistic and clinical investigations of the skeletal muscle system in ARDS and other critical illnesses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 74 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 133 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 <1%
Unknown 132 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 15%
Researcher 15 11%
Student > Postgraduate 14 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 10%
Student > Bachelor 10 8%
Other 35 26%
Unknown 26 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 64 48%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 4%
Unspecified 3 2%
Other 9 7%
Unknown 26 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 43. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2016.
All research outputs
#735,583
of 21,352,585 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#573
of 5,808 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,903
of 246,394 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,352,585 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,808 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 246,394 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them