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The role of grandparents in childhood obesity in China - evidence from a mixed methods study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
17 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
72 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
231 Mendeley
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Title
The role of grandparents in childhood obesity in China - evidence from a mixed methods study
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0251-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bai Li, Peymané Adab, Kar Keung Cheng

Abstract

The current literature on the influences of family environment on childhood obesity is predominantly based on western populations and has focused on the role of parents. This study examined the influence of grandparents on the development of obesity among Chinese primary school aged children. A mixed methods study was conducted in four socioeconomically distinct primary school communities in two cities of southern China. The qualitative study (17 focus groups and four personal interviews) involved parents, grandparents, school staff, and food retailers in the vicinity of the schools (n = 99) and explored perceived causes of childhood obesity. The cross-sectional study examined the association between children's objectively measured weight status and reported health behaviours, and the presence and role of grandparents in the household. It included children from three randomly selected third grade (8 to 10 years) classes from each school (n = 497). Grandparents were commonly perceived to contribute to childhood obesity through inappropriate perception (e.g. fat children are healthy and well cared for), knowledge (e.g. obesity related diseases can only happen in adults; the higher the dietary energy/fat content, the more nutritious the food), and behaviour (e.g. overfeeding and indulging through excusing the children from household chores). Conflicting child care beliefs and practices between grandparents and parents, and between grandparents and school teachers, were felt to undermine efforts to promote healthy behaviours in children. In the cross-sectional study, children who were mainly cared for by their grandparents were more likely to be overweight/obese (adjusted OR = 2.03; 95 % CI = 1.19 to 3.47); and to consume more sugar-added drinks and unhealthy snacks (B = 2.13, 95 % CI = 0.87 to 3.40), than children who were mainly cared for by their parents or other adult. Children who lived with two or more grandparents in the household were more likely to be overweight/obese than children who did not live with any grandparent (adjusted OR = 1.72; 95 % CI = 1.00 to 2.94). Involvement of grandparents in childcare is an important factor contributing to childhood obesity in China. Future preventive interventions should include strategies that target grandparents.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 231 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 229 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 44 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 18%
Researcher 23 10%
Student > Bachelor 20 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 8%
Other 42 18%
Unknown 41 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 44 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 37 16%
Social Sciences 32 14%
Psychology 22 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 5%
Other 36 16%
Unknown 48 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 100. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 February 2020.
All research outputs
#254,200
of 17,873,421 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#68
of 1,681 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,565
of 239,062 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,873,421 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,681 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 239,062 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them