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Let me Google that for you: a time series analysis of seasonality in internet search trends for terms related to foot and ankle pain

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
32 tweeters
facebook
9 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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30 Dimensions

Readers on

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66 Mendeley
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Title
Let me Google that for you: a time series analysis of seasonality in internet search trends for terms related to foot and ankle pain
Published in
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13047-015-0074-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Scott Telfer, James Woodburn

Abstract

The analysis of internet search traffic may present the opportunity to gain insights into general trends and patterns in information seeking behaviour related to medical conditions at a population level. For prevalent and widespread problems such as foot and ankle pain, this information has the potential to improve our understanding of seasonality and trends within these conditions and their treatments, and may act as a useful proxy for their true incidence/prevalence characteristics. This study aimed to explore seasonal effects, general trends and relative popularity of internet search terms related to foot and ankle pain over the past decade. We used the Google Trends tool to obtain relative search engine traffic for terms relating to foot and ankle pain and common treatments from Google search and affiliated pages for major northern and southern hemisphere English speaking nations. Analysis of overall trends and seasonality including summer/winter differences was carried out on these terms. Searches relating to general foot pain were on average 3.4 times more common than those relating to ankle pain, and twice as common as searches relating to heel pain. Distinct seasonal effects were seen in the northern hemisphere, with large increases in search volumes in the summer months compared to winter for foot (p = 0.004, 95 % CI [22.2-32.1]), ankle (p = 0.0078, 95 % CI [20.9-35.5]), and heel pain (p = 0.004, 95 % CI [29.1-45.6]). These seasonal effects were reflected by data from Australia, with the exception of ankle pain. Annual seasonal effects for treatment options were limited to terms related to foot surgery and ankle orthoses (p = 0.031, 95 % CI [3.5-20.9]; p = 0.004, 95 % CI [7.6-25.2] respectively), again increasing in the summer months. A number of general trends and annual seasonal effects were found in time series internet search data for terms relating to foot and ankle pain. This data may provide insights into these conditions at population levels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 32 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 65 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 18%
Researcher 10 15%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Postgraduate 5 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 13 20%
Unknown 14 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Engineering 4 6%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 5%
Other 13 20%
Unknown 22 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 25. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 July 2018.
All research outputs
#962,108
of 17,619,075 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#51
of 662 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,434
of 238,271 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,619,075 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 662 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,271 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them