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Signatures of host specialization and a recent transposable element burst in the dynamic one-speed genome of the fungal barley powdery mildew pathogen

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, May 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

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25 tweeters

Citations

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88 Dimensions

Readers on

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125 Mendeley
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Title
Signatures of host specialization and a recent transposable element burst in the dynamic one-speed genome of the fungal barley powdery mildew pathogen
Published in
BMC Genomics, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12864-018-4750-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lamprinos Frantzeskakis, Barbara Kracher, Stefan Kusch, Makoto Yoshikawa-Maekawa, Saskia Bauer, Carsten Pedersen, Pietro D. Spanu, Takaki Maekawa, Paul Schulze-Lefert, Ralph Panstruga

Abstract

Powdery mildews are biotrophic pathogenic fungi infecting a number of economically important plants. The grass powdery mildew, Blumeria graminis, has become a model organism to study host specialization of obligate biotrophic fungal pathogens. We resolved the large-scale genomic architecture of B. graminis forma specialis hordei (Bgh) to explore the potential influence of its genome organization on the co-evolutionary process with its host plant, barley (Hordeum vulgare). The near-chromosome level assemblies of the Bgh reference isolate DH14 and one of the most diversified isolates, RACE1, enabled a comparative analysis of these haploid genomes, which are highly enriched with transposable elements (TEs). We found largely retained genome synteny and gene repertoires, yet detected copy number variation (CNV) of secretion signal peptide-containing protein-coding genes (SPs) and locally disrupted synteny blocks. Genes coding for sequence-related SPs are often locally clustered, but neither the SPs nor the TEs reside preferentially in genomic regions with unique features. Extended comparative analysis with different host-specific B. graminis formae speciales revealed the existence of a core suite of SPs, but also isolate-specific SP sets as well as congruence of SP CNV and phylogenetic relationship. We further detected evidence for a recent, lineage-specific expansion of TEs in the Bgh genome. The characteristics of the Bgh genome (largely retained synteny, CNV of SP genes, recently proliferated TEs and a lack of significant compartmentalization) are consistent with a "one-speed" genome that differs in its architecture and (co-)evolutionary pattern from the "two-speed" genomes reported for several other filamentous phytopathogens.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 125 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 125 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 26%
Researcher 20 16%
Student > Master 16 13%
Student > Bachelor 16 13%
Student > Postgraduate 8 6%
Other 14 11%
Unknown 19 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 54 43%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 33 26%
Computer Science 5 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 2%
Chemical Engineering 2 2%
Other 5 4%
Unknown 23 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 February 2020.
All research outputs
#1,794,905
of 17,368,632 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#655
of 9,283 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#46,877
of 287,986 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#2
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,368,632 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,283 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,986 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.