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Mesenchymal stromal cells for cutaneous wound healing in a rabbit model: pre-clinical study applicable in the pediatric surgical setting

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
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Title
Mesenchymal stromal cells for cutaneous wound healing in a rabbit model: pre-clinical study applicable in the pediatric surgical setting
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12967-015-0580-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gloria Pelizzo, Maria Antonietta Avanzini, Antonia Icaro Cornaglia, Monica Osti, Piero Romano, Luigi Avolio, Rita Maccario, Massimo Dominici, Annalisa De Silvestri, Erika Andreatta, Federico Costanzo, Melissa Mantelli, Daniela Ingo, Serena Piccinno, Valeria Calcaterra

Abstract

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) expanded in vitro have been proposed as a potential therapy for congenital or acquired skin defects in pediatrics. The aim of this pre-clinical study was to investigate the effects of intradermal injections of MSC in experimental cutaneous wound repair comparing allogeneic and autologous adipose stem cells (ASCs) and autologous bone marrow-mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs). Mesenchymal stromal cells were in vitro expanded from adipose and BM tissues of young female New Zealand rabbits. MSCs were characterized for plastic adhesion, surface markers, proliferation and differentiation capacity. When an adequate number of cells (ASCs 10 × 10(6) and BM-MSCs 3 × 10(6), because of their low rate of proliferation) was reached, two skin wounds were surgically induced in each animal. The first was topically treated with cell infusions, the second was used as a control. The intradermal inoculation included autologous or allogeneic ASCs or autologous BM-MSCs. For histological examination, animals were sacrificed and wounds were harvested after 11 and 21 days of treatment. Rabbit ASCs were isolated and expanded in vitro with relative abundance, cells expressed typical surface markers (CD49e, CD90 and CD29). Topically, ASC inoculation provided more rapid wound healing than BM-MSCs and controls. Improved re-epithelization, reduced inflammatory infiltration and increased collagen deposition were observed in biopsies from wounds treated with ASCs, with the best result in the autologous setting. ASCs also improved restoration of skin architecture during wound healing. The use of ASCs may offer a promising solution to treat extended wounds. Pre-clinical studies are however necessary to validate the best skin regeneration technique, which could be used in pediatric surgical translational research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 54 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 19%
Student > Master 10 18%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 11%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 7%
Psychology 3 5%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 10 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 July 2015.
All research outputs
#698,279
of 5,376,712 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#142
of 1,511 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,013
of 186,677 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#7
of 98 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,376,712 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,511 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 186,677 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 98 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.