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The results of surgical treatment for pronation deformities of the forearm in cerebral palsy after a mean follow-up of 17.5 years

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, July 2015
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Title
The results of surgical treatment for pronation deformities of the forearm in cerebral palsy after a mean follow-up of 17.5 years
Published in
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13018-015-0251-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Goran Čobeljić, Stanislav Rajković, Zoran Bajin, Aleksandar Lešić, Marko Bumbaširević, Marko Aleksić, Henry Dushan Atkinson

Abstract

This study evaluates the effects of three surgical procedures in the treatment of pronation deformities of the forearm in cerebral palsy patients; namely the transposition of pronator teres to extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle; and rerouting of the pronator teres muscle with or without pronator quadratus muscle myotomy. Sixty-one patients, 48 male/13 female, with a mean age of 17 years (5-41 years) were treated between 1971 and 2011. Pronator teres transposition was performed in 10, pronator rerouting in 35, and pronator rereouting with pronator quadratus myotomy in 16 patients. Ranges of motion, and assessments using the Quick Dash, Mayo Scoring, and Functional Classification system of upper extremity, were made before and after surgery. Mean follow-up was 17.5 years (3-41 years). All three procedures led to significantly improved ranges of motion and upper limb function, with good/excellent results in 80 % of patients. Mean active supination improved from 10 ° (0-60 °) to 85 ° (30-90 °) (p < 0.001). There were significant improvements in Functional Classification system for the upper extremity scores (p < 0.003), Mean Quick Dash Scores improved from 58.41 (38.63-79.54) to 44.59 (27.27-68.18), and mean MEPS improved from 68 (30-85) to 84 (60-100) following surgery. All three techniques had statistically improved MEPS following surgery (p < 0.001); only the pronator teres muscle rerouting with pronator quadratus myotomy showed an improved Functional Classification system for the upper extremity score (p < 0.05); and only the pronator teres rerouting procedure showed an improved Quick Dash score (p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in outcomes between different ages groups, and no significant differences between isolated pronator teres muscle rerouting were compared with those undergoing simultaneous treatment of carpal flexion and thumb adduction deformities (p > 0.05). Surgery is very effective in the management of pronation deformities of the forearm in patients with cerebral palsy. Isolated pronator teres rerouting is probably the most effective and simple technique. Adjunctive pronator quadratus myotomy does not lead to an improvement in the results and requires an additional surgical approach. There should be no age restriction to surgery, as all age groups appear to benefit from similar improvements in range of motion and upper limb function.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 27%
Researcher 2 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Professor 1 5%
Other 5 23%
Unknown 4 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 45%
Psychology 2 9%
Neuroscience 2 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Chemistry 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 July 2015.
All research outputs
#2,829,696
of 5,328,866 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research
#137
of 301 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,110
of 185,867 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research
#19
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,328,866 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 301 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 185,867 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.