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Spontaneous and transgenic rodent models of inflammatory bowel disease

Overview of attention for article published in Laboratory Animal Research, January 2015
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Title
Spontaneous and transgenic rodent models of inflammatory bowel disease
Published in
Laboratory Animal Research, January 2015
DOI 10.5625/lar.2015.31.2.47
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susan Prattis, Abdo Jurjus

Abstract

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder with many different putative influences mediating disease onset, severity, progression and diminution. Spontaneous natural IBD is classically expressed as Crohn's Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC) commonly found in primates; lymphoplasmocytic enteritis, eosinophilic gastritis and colitis, and ulcerative colitis with neuronal hyperplasia in dogs; and colitis in horses. Spontaneous inflammatory bowel disease has been noted in a number of rodent models which differ in genetic strain background, induced mutation, microbiota influences and immunopathogenic pathways. Histological lesions in Crohn's Disease feature noncaseating granulomatous inflammation while UC lesions typically exhibit ulceration, lamina propria inflammatory infiltrates and lack of granuloma development. Intestinal inflammation caused by CD and UC is also associated with increased incidence of intestinal neoplasia. Transgenic murine models have determined underlying etiological influences and appropriate therapeutic targets in IBD. This literature review will discuss current opinion and findings in spontaneous IBD, highlight selected transgenic rodent models of IBD and discuss their respective pathogenic mechanisms. It is very important to provide accommodation of induced putative deficits in activities of daily living and to assess discomfort and pain levels in the face of significant morbidity and/or mortality in these models. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis, and evaluating ways in which they influence disease expression represent potential investigative approaches with the greatest potential for new discoveries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 2%
Unknown 50 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 27%
Researcher 8 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 14%
Student > Master 6 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 4%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 6 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 16%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 8%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 11 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 July 2015.
All research outputs
#9,640,280
of 12,051,352 outputs
Outputs from Laboratory Animal Research
#24
of 54 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#164,664
of 235,556 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Laboratory Animal Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,051,352 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 54 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,556 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them