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Effectiveness of control measures to prevent occupational tuberculosis infection in health care workers: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
97 Mendeley
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Title
Effectiveness of control measures to prevent occupational tuberculosis infection in health care workers: a systematic review
Published in
BMC Public Health, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5518-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bey-Marrié Schmidt, Mark E. Engel, Leila Abdullahi, Rodney Ehrlich

Abstract

A number of guideline documents have been published over the past decades on preventing occupational transmission of tuberculosis (TB) infection in health care workers (HCWs). However, direct evidence for the effectiveness of these controls is limited particularly in low-and middle-income (LMIC) countries. Thus, we sought to evaluate whether recommended administrative, environmental and personal protective measures are effective in preventing tuberculin skin test conversion among HCWs, and whether there has been recent research appropriate to LMIC needs. Using inclusion criteria that included tuberculin skin test (TST) conversion as the outcome and longitudinal study design, we searched a number of electronic databases, complemented by hand-searching of reference lists and contacting experts. Reviewers independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed study quality using recommended criteria and overall evidence quality using GRADE criteria. Ten before-after studies were found, including two from upper middle income countries. All reported a decline in TST conversion frequency after the intervention. Among five studies that provided rates, the size of the decline varied, ranging from 35 to 100%. Since all were observational studies assessed as having high or unclear risk of bias on at least some criteria, the overall quality of evidence was rated as low using GRADE criteria. We found consistent but low quality of evidence for the effectiveness of combined control measures in reducing TB infection transmission in HCWs in both high-income and upper-middle income country settings. However, research is needed in low-income high TB burden, including non-hospital, settings, and on contextual factors determining implementation of recommended control measures. Explicit attention to the reporting of methodological quality is recommended. This systematic review was registered with PROSPERO in 2014 and its registration number is CRD42014009087 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 97 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 14%
Student > Bachelor 11 11%
Student > Postgraduate 10 10%
Researcher 8 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 7%
Other 20 21%
Unknown 27 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 11%
Social Sciences 6 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 2%
Arts and Humanities 2 2%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 37 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 June 2019.
All research outputs
#2,046,985
of 15,922,732 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,403
of 10,952 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,748
of 282,063 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,732 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,952 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,063 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them