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Predictors of self-injury cessation and subsequent psychological growth: results of a probability sample survey of students in eight universities and colleges

Overview of attention for article published in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
5 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
53 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
187 Mendeley
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Title
Predictors of self-injury cessation and subsequent psychological growth: results of a probability sample survey of students in eight universities and colleges
Published in
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13034-015-0048-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Janis Whitlock, Kemar Prussien, Celeste Pietrusza

Abstract

Factors affecting non-suicidal self-injury cessation are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify differences between individuals with current and past non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in a large probability sample of university students using quantitative and qualitative methods. Predictors of psychological growth related following NSSI cessation were also examined. The sample included 836 students who participated in a larger online study of well-being at eight U.S. colleges and who reported current or past history of repeated NSSI. The average age of respondents used in analysis was 21.3 years. They were 78.3 % female and 21.7 % male and were 70.7 % Caucasian, 1.4 % African American/Black, 5.5 % Hispanic, 7.8 % Asian/Asian American and 14.7 % other. Analyses tested differences in demographics, NSSI characteristics (e.g. lifetime frequency, number of NSSI functions, NSSI disclosure), formal help-seeking, psychosocial factors, and mental health and trauma histories. Individuals with current NSSI status were more likely to be female and slightly younger, to report higher NSSI lifetime frequency, more NSSI forms and functions, thinking of themselves as a "self-injurer", and current psychological distress. Individuals with current NSSI status were less likely to report that self-injury interfered with life, that therapy was useful in stopping, perceiving social support, having a sense of meaning in life, access to more emotion regulation strategies, and life satisfaction. Qualitative data suggested that cessation may be attributable to changes in ability to regulate emotion (62.6 %), self-awareness (38.7 %), and important relationships to others (36.0 %). Psychological growth after stopping NSSI was predicted by more severe NSSI (form and perceived NSSI dependence), having talked about NSSI with others and higher numbers of confidantes, perceived life satisfaction, and a history of suicide action. These findings add to the still nascent body of literature examining processes related to NSSI cessation. Our results point to the importance of help-seeking and social support, as well as psychosocial processes in stopping NSSI.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 187 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 186 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 17%
Student > Master 24 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 23 12%
Student > Bachelor 22 12%
Researcher 17 9%
Other 32 17%
Unknown 37 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 87 47%
Social Sciences 17 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 5%
Unspecified 8 4%
Other 14 7%
Unknown 40 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2016.
All research outputs
#2,168,861
of 22,684,168 outputs
Outputs from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#90
of 647 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,209
of 262,155 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#3
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,684,168 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 647 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,155 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.