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Management of diabetic foot disease and amputation in the Irish health system: a qualitative study of patients’ attitudes and experiences with health services

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
117 Mendeley
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Title
Management of diabetic foot disease and amputation in the Irish health system: a qualitative study of patients’ attitudes and experiences with health services
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12913-015-0926-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah Delea, Claire Buckley, Andrew Hanrahan, Gerald McGreal, Deirdre Desmond, Sheena McHugh

Abstract

Diabetes is an increasingly prevalent chronic illness that places a huge burden on the individual, the health system and society. Patients with active foot disease and lower limb amputations due to diabetes have a significant amount of interaction with the health care services. The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and experiences of foot care services in Ireland among people with diabetes and active foot disease or lower limb amputations. A purposive sample of individuals who had either active foot disease or a lower limb amputation as a result of diabetes were recruited from the Prosthetic, Orthotic and Limb Absence Rehabilitation (POLAR) Unit of an Irish hospital. One-to-one interviews were conducted in the POLAR unit using a semi-structured topic guide. Thematic analysis was used to identify, analyse and describe patterns within the data. Ten males participated in the study. Most participants expressed a need for emotional support alongside the medical management of their condition. There were substantial differences between participants with regard to the level of education and information they appeared to have received regarding their illness. There were also variations in levels of service received. Transport and medication costs were considered barriers. Having a medical card, which entitles the holder to free medical care, eased the burden of the patient's illness. A number of participants attributed some of the problems they faced with services to the health care system as a whole rather than health care professionals. Results suggest that rehabilitation services should place a strong focus on psychological as well as physical adjustment to active foot disease or lower limb amputations. The delivery of services needs to be standardised to ensure equal access to medical care and supplies among people with or at risk of lower extremity amputations. The wider social circumstances of patients should be taken into consideration by health care professionals to provide effective support while patients adjust to this potentially life changing complication. The patient's perspective should also be used to inform health service managers and health professionals on ways to improve services.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 117 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
Unknown 115 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 27 23%
Student > Bachelor 19 16%
Researcher 9 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Student > Postgraduate 7 6%
Other 21 18%
Unknown 26 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 30 26%
Psychology 5 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Engineering 3 3%
Other 13 11%
Unknown 32 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 April 2016.
All research outputs
#1,465,110
of 7,516,464 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#757
of 2,823 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,554
of 223,881 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#34
of 107 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,516,464 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,823 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,881 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 107 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.