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MARCKS and MARCKS-like proteins in development and regeneration

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Biomedical Science, May 2018
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Title
MARCKS and MARCKS-like proteins in development and regeneration
Published in
Journal of Biomedical Science, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12929-018-0445-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mohamed El Amri, Una Fitzgerald, Gerhard Schlosser

Abstract

The Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C-kinase Substrate (MARCKS) and MARCKS-like protein 1 (MARCKSL1) have a wide range of functions, ranging from roles in embryonic development to adult brain plasticity and the inflammatory response. Recently, both proteins have also been identified as important players in regeneration. Upon phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) or calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding, MARCKS and MARCKSL1 translocate from the membrane into the cytosol, modulating cytoskeletal actin dynamics and vesicular trafficking and activating various signal transduction pathways. As a consequence, the two proteins are involved in the regulation of cell migration, secretion, proliferation and differentiation in many different tissues. Throughout vertebrate development, MARCKS and MARCKSL1 are widely expressed in tissues derived from all germ layers, with particularly strong expression in the nervous system. They have been implicated in the regulation of gastrulation, myogenesis, brain development, and other developmental processes. Mice carrying loss of function mutations in either Marcks or Marcksl1 genes die shortly after birth due to multiple deficiencies including detrimental neural tube closure defects. In adult vertebrates, MARCKS and MARCKL1 continue to be important for multiple regenerative processes including peripheral nerve, appendage, and tail regeneration, making them promising targets for regenerative medicine. This review briefly summarizes the molecular interactions and cellular functions of MARCKS and MARCKSL1 proteins and outlines their vital roles in development and regeneration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 62 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 16%
Researcher 9 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Other 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 14 23%
Unknown 12 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 22 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 23%
Engineering 3 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 3%
Philosophy 1 2%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 14 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2018.
All research outputs
#10,364,306
of 12,991,172 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Biomedical Science
#501
of 642 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,343
of 271,479 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Biomedical Science
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,991,172 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 642 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them